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Fathers’ Changing Contributions to Child Care and Domestic Work in Very Low–Fertility Countries

Fathers’ Changing Contributions to Child Care and Domestic Work in Very Low–Fertility Countries Comparing a cluster of European countries that have recently experienced very low fertility with other industrialized countries, we hypothesize a connection between fertility behavior and fathers’ increasing participation in unpaid work. Using cross-national time use data we find significant evidence of recent increases in the contribution of younger, more highly educated fathers to child care and core domestic work in very low–fertility countries that have recently experienced upturns in fertility. The pace of these increases exceeds that found in the comparison group of other industrialized countries. We interpret these findings as suggestive evidence for a process of cross-national social diffusion of more egalitarian domestic gender relations, in particular among more highly educated fathers, acting to facilitate a turnaround in the pattern of postponed and foregone fertility which has characterized lowest low– and very low–fertility countries. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Family Issues SAGE

Fathers’ Changing Contributions to Child Care and Domestic Work in Very Low–Fertility Countries

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References (51)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2014
ISSN
0192-513X
eISSN
1552-5481
DOI
10.1177/0192513X14522241
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Comparing a cluster of European countries that have recently experienced very low fertility with other industrialized countries, we hypothesize a connection between fertility behavior and fathers’ increasing participation in unpaid work. Using cross-national time use data we find significant evidence of recent increases in the contribution of younger, more highly educated fathers to child care and core domestic work in very low–fertility countries that have recently experienced upturns in fertility. The pace of these increases exceeds that found in the comparison group of other industrialized countries. We interpret these findings as suggestive evidence for a process of cross-national social diffusion of more egalitarian domestic gender relations, in particular among more highly educated fathers, acting to facilitate a turnaround in the pattern of postponed and foregone fertility which has characterized lowest low– and very low–fertility countries.

Journal

Journal of Family IssuesSAGE

Published: Jun 1, 2014

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