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Foreigners Cometh! Paths to Multiculturalism in Japan, Korea and Taiwan

Foreigners Cometh! Paths to Multiculturalism in Japan, Korea and Taiwan This paper has a four-fold goal: (1) it examines the difficulties faced by Japan, Korea and Taiwan in developing and implementing multicultural programs for their newly arriving migrants; (2) it offers an analysis of indigenous ethnic formation and migration of workers and marriage migrants in the context of ongoing debates on multiculturalism in East Asia; (3) it analyzes narratives behind the educational reforms to shed light on the political contention surrounding multicultural governance in the region; and (4) it discusses why educational institutions in East Asia seem uninterested in offering courses on multiculturalism. This paper suggests that the three countries will continue to face substantial difficulties in institutionalizing their own democratic multiculturalism(s) due to pressures from global and domestic forces. We expect that the three countries will continue to modify their approaches to multicultural governance despite institutional constraints. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian and Pacific Migration Journal SAGE

Foreigners Cometh! Paths to Multiculturalism in Japan, Korea and Taiwan

Asian and Pacific Migration Journal , Volume 21 (1): 29 – Mar 1, 2012

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References (87)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2012 Scalabrini Migration Center
ISSN
0117-1968
DOI
10.1177/011719681202100105
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper has a four-fold goal: (1) it examines the difficulties faced by Japan, Korea and Taiwan in developing and implementing multicultural programs for their newly arriving migrants; (2) it offers an analysis of indigenous ethnic formation and migration of workers and marriage migrants in the context of ongoing debates on multiculturalism in East Asia; (3) it analyzes narratives behind the educational reforms to shed light on the political contention surrounding multicultural governance in the region; and (4) it discusses why educational institutions in East Asia seem uninterested in offering courses on multiculturalism. This paper suggests that the three countries will continue to face substantial difficulties in institutionalizing their own democratic multiculturalism(s) due to pressures from global and domestic forces. We expect that the three countries will continue to modify their approaches to multicultural governance despite institutional constraints.

Journal

Asian and Pacific Migration JournalSAGE

Published: Mar 1, 2012

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