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Foreword

Foreword 16 OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY DF.cEM8ER 1957 to the following article From July 17th to 20th, 1957, I was written an account collecting together the vital information. At the same time I privileged to attend a course on .. The am deeply conscious of the debt J owe to Principles of Administration" organised the various speakers, whom I would like by one 0/ our allied associations-s-the to thank by name: Mr. H. A. Goddard Chartered Society 0/ Physiotherapy-at Selwyn College, Cambridge. for his inspiring opening address, Mrs. N. Barnett, Mr. H. A. Walker, Mr. S. G. Although the course was primarily in­ Hill, Mrs. E. W. Parsons. Mr. D. C. tended lor superintendent physiotherapists Norris and Mr. A. C. Stuart-Clark. who (26 members 0/ the total of 54 attend­ gave the final lecture. I should also like ing the course were superintendent to express my appreciation to the York physiotherapists) a great deal of the sub­ ject matter was applicable to the run­ .. A .. and Tadcaster Hospital Manage­ ning and organisation 0/ occupational ment Committee for granting me leave therapy departments, and indeed to any to attend the course. unit of professional people. I therefore Needless to say. I hold myself respon­ felt that a review of the course should sible for statements of comment. and so be written; inevitably, however, the sub­ ject matter chosen by the lecturing team I have called the report-for undoubtedly overlapped, and on reflection I have that is what it is ... ASPECTS OF ADMINISTRATION By LEONARD G. ALLBON. M.A.O.T., St. Love's School of Occupational Therapy, Exeter. In order that basic principles may be course, gleaned from reviewing records recognised and aptly applied" Adminis­ and considering rules and policies pre­ tration " as a concept needs to be defined, viously established, from other people and the definition I most like is: "the fully conversant with the problem, or art of making it possible for other people lastly by means of adequately designed to work efficiently and with satisfaction experiments.' Good planning demands to themselves."! Administration is thus simplicity and balance, in which all parts an enabling process, getting things done, of the overall design are successfully in­ carrying into effect a plan. Adminis­ tegrated so that they can operate with tration therefore embraces leadership, equal effectiveness. A plan can, of policy making-what has to be done­ course, only use the available resources, and planning both the organisation and although this fact is not apparently execution of the resulting work situation. always appreciated, and it should provide Note that at best one person can most for an analysis of the work involved­ simply carry out these processes. job analysis, that is-based upon the appreciation that in a hospital as in most Administration is a means to an end, large organisations various jobs are not an end in itself, and it must be based undertaken and performed only by grades upon facts, verifiable facts that may need of people working to laid-down regula­ to be investigated, collected and analysed tions. in order to forecast the policy involved and carry it through to success. Thus In other words the principle of reality here the old formula of "cause and must be kept in mind to give value to effect" becomes readily apparent, fore­ the end result, and any plan kept flexible casting giving way to a plan. organisation in order to take full advantage of a affecting co-ordination. and lastly com­ changing situation. mand making for complete controlS ORGANISATION PLANNING One of the first objectives in successful It is in the field of organisation that administration possibly makes its greatest administration is to have a clearly defined objective, and this will need to be based contribution to the success of a plan, on sufficient facts to establish and iden­ and in the hospital world the old Ser­ vice adage of .. creating organised chaos tify the problem-acceptable facts, of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Occupational Therapy: the Official Journal of the Association of Occupational Therapists SAGE

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 1957 The College of Occupational Therapists Ltd
ISSN
0029-800X
eISSN
1477-6006
DOI
10.1177/030802265702001205
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

16 OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY DF.cEM8ER 1957 to the following article From July 17th to 20th, 1957, I was written an account collecting together the vital information. At the same time I privileged to attend a course on .. The am deeply conscious of the debt J owe to Principles of Administration" organised the various speakers, whom I would like by one 0/ our allied associations-s-the to thank by name: Mr. H. A. Goddard Chartered Society 0/ Physiotherapy-at Selwyn College, Cambridge. for his inspiring opening address, Mrs. N. Barnett, Mr. H. A. Walker, Mr. S. G. Although the course was primarily in­ Hill, Mrs. E. W. Parsons. Mr. D. C. tended lor superintendent physiotherapists Norris and Mr. A. C. Stuart-Clark. who (26 members 0/ the total of 54 attend­ gave the final lecture. I should also like ing the course were superintendent to express my appreciation to the York physiotherapists) a great deal of the sub­ ject matter was applicable to the run­ .. A .. and Tadcaster Hospital Manage­ ning and organisation 0/ occupational ment Committee for granting me leave therapy departments, and indeed to any to attend the course. unit of professional people. I therefore Needless to say. I hold myself respon­ felt that a review of the course should sible for statements of comment. and so be written; inevitably, however, the sub­ ject matter chosen by the lecturing team I have called the report-for undoubtedly overlapped, and on reflection I have that is what it is ... ASPECTS OF ADMINISTRATION By LEONARD G. ALLBON. M.A.O.T., St. Love's School of Occupational Therapy, Exeter. In order that basic principles may be course, gleaned from reviewing records recognised and aptly applied" Adminis­ and considering rules and policies pre­ tration " as a concept needs to be defined, viously established, from other people and the definition I most like is: "the fully conversant with the problem, or art of making it possible for other people lastly by means of adequately designed to work efficiently and with satisfaction experiments.' Good planning demands to themselves."! Administration is thus simplicity and balance, in which all parts an enabling process, getting things done, of the overall design are successfully in­ carrying into effect a plan. Adminis­ tegrated so that they can operate with tration therefore embraces leadership, equal effectiveness. A plan can, of policy making-what has to be done­ course, only use the available resources, and planning both the organisation and although this fact is not apparently execution of the resulting work situation. always appreciated, and it should provide Note that at best one person can most for an analysis of the work involved­ simply carry out these processes. job analysis, that is-based upon the appreciation that in a hospital as in most Administration is a means to an end, large organisations various jobs are not an end in itself, and it must be based undertaken and performed only by grades upon facts, verifiable facts that may need of people working to laid-down regula­ to be investigated, collected and analysed tions. in order to forecast the policy involved and carry it through to success. Thus In other words the principle of reality here the old formula of "cause and must be kept in mind to give value to effect" becomes readily apparent, fore­ the end result, and any plan kept flexible casting giving way to a plan. organisation in order to take full advantage of a affecting co-ordination. and lastly com­ changing situation. mand making for complete controlS ORGANISATION PLANNING One of the first objectives in successful It is in the field of organisation that administration possibly makes its greatest administration is to have a clearly defined objective, and this will need to be based contribution to the success of a plan, on sufficient facts to establish and iden­ and in the hospital world the old Ser­ vice adage of .. creating organised chaos tify the problem-acceptable facts, of

Journal

Occupational Therapy: the Official Journal of the Association of Occupational TherapistsSAGE

Published: Dec 1, 1957

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