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Globalization and Borders: death at the global frontier

Globalization and Borders: death at the global frontier 116 Race & Class 54(2) belief in international working class solidarity’. These ‘core values’ add up to what she describes as a commitment to ‘internationalism’. Now, these values might well be embodied in resolutions and speeches at party conferences, but, as she herself acknowledges, in the real world, ‘the Labour leadership tended to see the bedrock of British security as the Anglo-American alliance’. However, this alliance is nowhere evident in the six core values and, moreover, it can be con- vincingly argued that it has involved the decisive and consistent violation of all of them. Consequently, it can be reasonably argued that in order to understand Labour’s foreign policy since 1951, the starting point should be exploring the rea- sons for the party’s longstanding commitment to American imperialism. These so-called ‘core values’ are just so much rhetoric that the leadership feels obliged to tolerate, but they certainly do not inform policy when in government. In the past, they sometimes restricted the Labour government’s room for manoeu- vre; for example, the Wilson government did not dare send British troops to fight in Vietnam because of the strength of a Labour Left that did take her ‘core values’ seriously. But this http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Race & Class: A Journal on Racism, Empire and Globalisation SAGE

Globalization and Borders: death at the global frontier

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2012 Institute of Race Relations
ISSN
0306-3968
eISSN
1741-3125
DOI
10.1177/0306396812444829
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

116 Race & Class 54(2) belief in international working class solidarity’. These ‘core values’ add up to what she describes as a commitment to ‘internationalism’. Now, these values might well be embodied in resolutions and speeches at party conferences, but, as she herself acknowledges, in the real world, ‘the Labour leadership tended to see the bedrock of British security as the Anglo-American alliance’. However, this alliance is nowhere evident in the six core values and, moreover, it can be con- vincingly argued that it has involved the decisive and consistent violation of all of them. Consequently, it can be reasonably argued that in order to understand Labour’s foreign policy since 1951, the starting point should be exploring the rea- sons for the party’s longstanding commitment to American imperialism. These so-called ‘core values’ are just so much rhetoric that the leadership feels obliged to tolerate, but they certainly do not inform policy when in government. In the past, they sometimes restricted the Labour government’s room for manoeu- vre; for example, the Wilson government did not dare send British troops to fight in Vietnam because of the strength of a Labour Left that did take her ‘core values’ seriously. But this

Journal

Race & Class: A Journal on Racism, Empire and GlobalisationSAGE

Published: Oct 1, 2012

There are no references for this article.