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Healthy cities or unhealthy islands? The health and social implications of urban inequality

Healthy cities or unhealthy islands? The health and social implications of urban inequality This paper suggests that governments and international agencies must address thelarge and often growing levels of inequality within most cities if health is to beimproved and poverty reduced. It describes the social and health implications ofinequalities within cities and discusses why descriptions of the physical symptomsof poverty (and their health implications) are more common than analyses of thestructural systems which produce and perpetuate poverty. It also describes thehealth problems from which low-income groups in urban areas suffer more than richergroups including those that are not linked to poor sanitary conditions and thosethat are more linked to relative poverty (and thus the level of inequality) than toabsolute poverty. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environment and Urbanization SAGE

Healthy cities or unhealthy islands? The health and social implications of urban inequality

Environment and Urbanization , Volume 8 (2): 22 – Oct 1, 1996

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References (25)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
0956-2478
eISSN
1746-0301
DOI
10.1177/095624789600800211
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper suggests that governments and international agencies must address thelarge and often growing levels of inequality within most cities if health is to beimproved and poverty reduced. It describes the social and health implications ofinequalities within cities and discusses why descriptions of the physical symptomsof poverty (and their health implications) are more common than analyses of thestructural systems which produce and perpetuate poverty. It also describes thehealth problems from which low-income groups in urban areas suffer more than richergroups including those that are not linked to poor sanitary conditions and thosethat are more linked to relative poverty (and thus the level of inequality) than toabsolute poverty.

Journal

Environment and UrbanizationSAGE

Published: Oct 1, 1996

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