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Intervention-Sanction and ‘Droit D'ingérence’ in International Humanitarian Law

Intervention-Sanction and ‘Droit D'ingérence’ in International Humanitarian Law PHILIPPE GARIGUE Intervention-sanction and 'droit d'ingerence' in international humanitarian law Enfin, A une 6poque oft l'on parle tant de progr4s et de civil- isation, et puisque malheureusement les guerres ne peuvent &tre toujours 6vit~es, n'est-il pas urgent d'insister pour que F'on cherche, dans un esprit d'humanit6 et de vraie civilisation a en prevenir, ou au moins A en adoucir les horreurs? J. Henri Dunant, Un Souvenir de Solf rino, 1862 The very nature of violence has changed in this century, and. wars have become not so much confrontations between armies as outbreaks of mass destruction in which there is no longer any differentiation between soldiers and civilians. While the hor- rors of war in all eras have prompted the establishment of rules in an attempt to prevent the worst of man's inhumanity to man, in more recent times efforts have been directed at ways to pro- tect civilian populations and to limit the worst effects of such conflicts. These efforts have often depended on a threat of vio- lence by other governments as an intervention-sanction, and in consequence such interventions have often increased the destructiveness of war. Over time, therefore, as humanitarian rules in international law have developed, it http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal: Canada's Journal of Global Policy Analysis SAGE

Intervention-Sanction and ‘Droit D'ingérence’ in International Humanitarian Law

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References (3)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 1993 Canadian International Council/Centre for Contemporary International History
ISSN
0020-7020
eISSN
2052-465X
DOI
10.1177/002070209304800404
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

PHILIPPE GARIGUE Intervention-sanction and 'droit d'ingerence' in international humanitarian law Enfin, A une 6poque oft l'on parle tant de progr4s et de civil- isation, et puisque malheureusement les guerres ne peuvent &tre toujours 6vit~es, n'est-il pas urgent d'insister pour que F'on cherche, dans un esprit d'humanit6 et de vraie civilisation a en prevenir, ou au moins A en adoucir les horreurs? J. Henri Dunant, Un Souvenir de Solf rino, 1862 The very nature of violence has changed in this century, and. wars have become not so much confrontations between armies as outbreaks of mass destruction in which there is no longer any differentiation between soldiers and civilians. While the hor- rors of war in all eras have prompted the establishment of rules in an attempt to prevent the worst of man's inhumanity to man, in more recent times efforts have been directed at ways to pro- tect civilian populations and to limit the worst effects of such conflicts. These efforts have often depended on a threat of vio- lence by other governments as an intervention-sanction, and in consequence such interventions have often increased the destructiveness of war. Over time, therefore, as humanitarian rules in international law have developed, it

Journal

International Journal: Canada's Journal of Global Policy AnalysisSAGE

Published: Dec 1, 1993

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