Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Subscribe now for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Intimacy and Intergenerational Relations in Rural China

Intimacy and Intergenerational Relations in Rural China This article applies the concept of intimacy to examine relationships between adult children and their parents in rural China – an area which has been predominantly located in an obligatory framework. I reveal a qualitative difference in support between relationships built on intimate ties and those bound by duty and obligation. A unilateral emphasis on obligation-based relationships can deprive both the parent and adult child generations of agency and autonomy, which can be disempowering for both. The complex relations between intimacy and obligation are the product of local socio-economic circumstances and gender norms. Although traditional patrilineal and patrilocal culture excludes married daughters from the filial discourse surrounding their own parents, they are often considered to have the most intimate relationship with their parents. Paradoxically, the practices of intimacy between aged parents and their married daughters strengthen the natal ties that facilitate modifications to patrilocal and patrilineal customs. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Sociology SAGE

Intimacy and Intergenerational Relations in Rural China

Sociology , Volume 51 (5): 16 – Oct 1, 2017

Loading next page...
 
/lp/sage/intimacy-and-intergenerational-relations-in-rural-china-awLtGQoZLF

References (58)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2016
ISSN
0038-0385
eISSN
1469-8684
DOI
10.1177/0038038516639505
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article applies the concept of intimacy to examine relationships between adult children and their parents in rural China – an area which has been predominantly located in an obligatory framework. I reveal a qualitative difference in support between relationships built on intimate ties and those bound by duty and obligation. A unilateral emphasis on obligation-based relationships can deprive both the parent and adult child generations of agency and autonomy, which can be disempowering for both. The complex relations between intimacy and obligation are the product of local socio-economic circumstances and gender norms. Although traditional patrilineal and patrilocal culture excludes married daughters from the filial discourse surrounding their own parents, they are often considered to have the most intimate relationship with their parents. Paradoxically, the practices of intimacy between aged parents and their married daughters strengthen the natal ties that facilitate modifications to patrilocal and patrilineal customs.

Journal

SociologySAGE

Published: Oct 1, 2017

There are no references for this article.