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Introduction

Introduction Special Issue: Postcolonial Technoscience Postcolonial Technoscience Warwick Anderson ‘Postcolonial technoscience’ is a deliberately ambiguous title, calculated to elicit the question: ‘what might it mean?’ Too often the ‘postcolonial’ seems to imply yet another global theory, or simply a celebration of the end of colonialism. But it may also be viewed as a signpost pointing to contem- porary phenomena in need of new modes of analysis and requiring new critiques. Some older styles of analysis in science studies – those that assume relatively closed communities and are predicated on the nation- state – do not seem adapted to explaining the co-production of identities, technologies and cultural formations characteristic of an emerging global order. A postcolonial perspective suggests fresh ways to study the changing political economies of capitalism and science, the mutual reorganization of the global and the local, the increasing transnational traffic of people, practices, technologies, and contemporary contests over ‘intellectual property’. The term ‘postcolonial’ thus refers both to new configurations of technoscience and to the critical modes of analysis that identify them. We hope that a closer engagement of science studies with postcolonial studies will allow us to question technoscience differently, find more heterogeneous sources, and reveal more fully http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Social Studies of Science: An International Review of Research in the Social Dimensions of Science and Technology SAGE

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References (67)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
0306-3127
eISSN
1460-3659
DOI
10.1177/030631270203200502
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Special Issue: Postcolonial Technoscience Postcolonial Technoscience Warwick Anderson ‘Postcolonial technoscience’ is a deliberately ambiguous title, calculated to elicit the question: ‘what might it mean?’ Too often the ‘postcolonial’ seems to imply yet another global theory, or simply a celebration of the end of colonialism. But it may also be viewed as a signpost pointing to contem- porary phenomena in need of new modes of analysis and requiring new critiques. Some older styles of analysis in science studies – those that assume relatively closed communities and are predicated on the nation- state – do not seem adapted to explaining the co-production of identities, technologies and cultural formations characteristic of an emerging global order. A postcolonial perspective suggests fresh ways to study the changing political economies of capitalism and science, the mutual reorganization of the global and the local, the increasing transnational traffic of people, practices, technologies, and contemporary contests over ‘intellectual property’. The term ‘postcolonial’ thus refers both to new configurations of technoscience and to the critical modes of analysis that identify them. We hope that a closer engagement of science studies with postcolonial studies will allow us to question technoscience differently, find more heterogeneous sources, and reveal more fully

Journal

Social Studies of Science: An International Review of Research in the Social Dimensions of Science and TechnologySAGE

Published: Dec 1, 2002

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