Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Introduction to Special Issue on Gentrification and Public Policy

Introduction to Special Issue on Gentrification and Public Policy 45(12) 2379–2384, November 2008 Introduction to Special Issue on Gentrification and Public Policy Loretta Lees and David Ley [Paper first received, July 2008; in final form, July 2008] More than ever before, gentrifi cation is in- in the gentrifi cation of inner London in the corporated into public policy—used either early 1970s (Hamnett, 1973), while the Urban as a justifi cation to obey market forces and Homesteading Program of the US Depart- private sector entrepreneurialism, or as a tool ment of Housing and Urban Development to direct market processes in the hopes of facilitated the gentrifi cation of neighbour- restructuring urban landscapes in a slightly hoods like the Lower East Side in New York more benevolent fashion (Wyly and Hammel, City during the same period (Lees and Bondi, 2005, p. 35). 1995). In his 2005 essay on the order and simplicity Not that the state was usually at the front end of gentrifi cation, and certainly not inten- of gentrification, Eric Clark presented a challenge to gentrifi cation researchers, “to tionally so; in cities from Adelaide to Toronto, local government had to be persuaded, often engage in comparative analyses with a focus on policy issues” (pp. 257–258). That is http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Urban Studies: An International Journal of Research in Urban Studies SAGE

Introduction to Special Issue on Gentrification and Public Policy

Loading next page...
 
/lp/sage/introduction-to-special-issue-on-gentrification-and-public-policy-Vd7ySxh7cE

References (28)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
0042-0980
eISSN
1360-063X
DOI
10.1177/0042098008097098
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

45(12) 2379–2384, November 2008 Introduction to Special Issue on Gentrification and Public Policy Loretta Lees and David Ley [Paper first received, July 2008; in final form, July 2008] More than ever before, gentrifi cation is in- in the gentrifi cation of inner London in the corporated into public policy—used either early 1970s (Hamnett, 1973), while the Urban as a justifi cation to obey market forces and Homesteading Program of the US Depart- private sector entrepreneurialism, or as a tool ment of Housing and Urban Development to direct market processes in the hopes of facilitated the gentrifi cation of neighbour- restructuring urban landscapes in a slightly hoods like the Lower East Side in New York more benevolent fashion (Wyly and Hammel, City during the same period (Lees and Bondi, 2005, p. 35). 1995). In his 2005 essay on the order and simplicity Not that the state was usually at the front end of gentrifi cation, and certainly not inten- of gentrification, Eric Clark presented a challenge to gentrifi cation researchers, “to tionally so; in cities from Adelaide to Toronto, local government had to be persuaded, often engage in comparative analyses with a focus on policy issues” (pp. 257–258). That is

Journal

Urban Studies: An International Journal of Research in Urban StudiesSAGE

Published: Nov 1, 2008

There are no references for this article.