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It Takes a Village

It Takes a Village Richard Florida argues that the “creative class” is inextricably connected with surges in urban growth. This article, using data from 276 metropolitan statistical areas, empirically tests the creative class theory as compared to the human and social capital models of economic growth. Our results demonstrate that the creative class is not related to growth, whereas human capital predicts economic growth and development and social capital predicts average wage but not job growth. Additionally, we found that clusters of universities correlated highly with economic growth. Our findings should warn policy makers against the use of “creative” strategies for urban economic development. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Urban Affairs Review SAGE

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References (119)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
1078-0874
eISSN
1552-8332
DOI
10.1177/1078087408321496
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Richard Florida argues that the “creative class” is inextricably connected with surges in urban growth. This article, using data from 276 metropolitan statistical areas, empirically tests the creative class theory as compared to the human and social capital models of economic growth. Our results demonstrate that the creative class is not related to growth, whereas human capital predicts economic growth and development and social capital predicts average wage but not job growth. Additionally, we found that clusters of universities correlated highly with economic growth. Our findings should warn policy makers against the use of “creative” strategies for urban economic development.

Journal

Urban Affairs ReviewSAGE

Published: Jan 1, 2009

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