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Marriage Delayed or Marriage Forgone? New Cohort Forecasts of First Marriage for U.S. Women

Marriage Delayed or Marriage Forgone? New Cohort Forecasts of First Marriage for U.S. Women Do recent declines in first marriage rates signal that an increasing proportion of women will remain single their entire lives, or merely that they are postponing marriage to older ages? Our forecasts for cohorts born in the 1950s and 1960s suggest that marriage will remain nearly universal for American women—close to 90 percent of women are predicted to marry. However, separate forecasts by educational attainment reveal a new socioeconomic pattern of first marriage: Whereas in the past, women with more education were less likely to marry, recent college graduates are now forecast to marry at higher levels despite their later entry into first marriage. This educational crossover, which occurs for both black women and white women in recent cohorts, suggests that marriage is increasingly becoming a province of the most educated, a trend that may become a new source of inequality for future generations. Forecasts presented here use data from the 1995 Current Population Survey and compare estimates from the Hemes model with those from the Coale-McNeil model. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Sociological Review SAGE

Marriage Delayed or Marriage Forgone? New Cohort Forecasts of First Marriage for U.S. Women

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References (52)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2001 American Sociological Association
ISSN
0003-1224
eISSN
1939-8271
DOI
10.1177/000312240106600402
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Do recent declines in first marriage rates signal that an increasing proportion of women will remain single their entire lives, or merely that they are postponing marriage to older ages? Our forecasts for cohorts born in the 1950s and 1960s suggest that marriage will remain nearly universal for American women—close to 90 percent of women are predicted to marry. However, separate forecasts by educational attainment reveal a new socioeconomic pattern of first marriage: Whereas in the past, women with more education were less likely to marry, recent college graduates are now forecast to marry at higher levels despite their later entry into first marriage. This educational crossover, which occurs for both black women and white women in recent cohorts, suggests that marriage is increasingly becoming a province of the most educated, a trend that may become a new source of inequality for future generations. Forecasts presented here use data from the 1995 Current Population Survey and compare estimates from the Hemes model with those from the Coale-McNeil model.

Journal

American Sociological ReviewSAGE

Published: Aug 1, 2001

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