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Measure for Measure: Evaluating the Evidence of Culture's Contribution to Regeneration

Measure for Measure: Evaluating the Evidence of Culture's Contribution to Regeneration Culture-led regeneration, as it has come to be known, is now a feature of cities-old and new-as they seek to revive former industrial and waterfront sites and city centres, and establish themselves as competitive cities of culture. At the same time, the rationale for cultural input to area and neighbourhood regeneration has been extended to include quality of life, as well as economic outcomes. The evidence of how far flagship and major cultural projects contribute to a range of regeneration objectives is, however, limited. Measuring the social, economic and environmental impacts attributed to the cultural element in area regeneration is problematic and the 'evidence' is seldom robust. The paper reviews both evidence and the indicators used to measure impacts and concludes with an assessment of how and why gaps in evidence persist. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Urban Studies: An International Journal of Research in Urban Studies SAGE

Measure for Measure: Evaluating the Evidence of Culture's Contribution to Regeneration

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References (124)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
0042-0980
eISSN
1360-063X
DOI
10.1080/00420980500107102
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Culture-led regeneration, as it has come to be known, is now a feature of cities-old and new-as they seek to revive former industrial and waterfront sites and city centres, and establish themselves as competitive cities of culture. At the same time, the rationale for cultural input to area and neighbourhood regeneration has been extended to include quality of life, as well as economic outcomes. The evidence of how far flagship and major cultural projects contribute to a range of regeneration objectives is, however, limited. Measuring the social, economic and environmental impacts attributed to the cultural element in area regeneration is problematic and the 'evidence' is seldom robust. The paper reviews both evidence and the indicators used to measure impacts and concludes with an assessment of how and why gaps in evidence persist.

Journal

Urban Studies: An International Journal of Research in Urban StudiesSAGE

Published: May 1, 2005

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