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Measuring religious costs and rewards in a cross-cultural perspective

Measuring religious costs and rewards in a cross-cultural perspective The assumption of rationally motivated individual religious behavior was tested in a survey of undergraduate university students from four different cultural/religious environments: Slovenia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia, and the United States of America. In particular, an attempt was made to explain readiness to bear religious costs by the expectation of otherworldly rewards and some other variables, such as religious socialization, support in the upbringing of children, religious capital, satisfaction with religious services and the perceived social sanctions for possible religious nonparticipation. It was found that it is the otherworldly rewards in all the samples that explain by far the major part of the variance in the readiness to bear religious costs. These results suggest that individuals do tend to make rational choices even when it comes to religion. Based on their beliefs, they are ready to accept religious costs approximately to the level of their expectation of otherworldly rewards. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Rationality and Society SAGE

Measuring religious costs and rewards in a cross-cultural perspective

Rationality and Society , Volume 22 (2): 14 – May 1, 2010

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References (15)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2010
ISSN
1043-4631
eISSN
1461-7358
DOI
10.1177/1043463110366227
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The assumption of rationally motivated individual religious behavior was tested in a survey of undergraduate university students from four different cultural/religious environments: Slovenia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia, and the United States of America. In particular, an attempt was made to explain readiness to bear religious costs by the expectation of otherworldly rewards and some other variables, such as religious socialization, support in the upbringing of children, religious capital, satisfaction with religious services and the perceived social sanctions for possible religious nonparticipation. It was found that it is the otherworldly rewards in all the samples that explain by far the major part of the variance in the readiness to bear religious costs. These results suggest that individuals do tend to make rational choices even when it comes to religion. Based on their beliefs, they are ready to accept religious costs approximately to the level of their expectation of otherworldly rewards.

Journal

Rationality and SocietySAGE

Published: May 1, 2010

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