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Meth Wars: Police, Media, Power

Meth Wars: Police, Media, Power Briefly Noted 383 networks that provide support and healing create a powerful connection between as well as connecting different generations viewers and the drug, thus fueling the meth- of mixed-blood Indians. Jolivette writes that amphetamine imaginary. Within these the model will encourage further develop- campaigns, Linnemann identifies many ment of community-based and scholarly instances of class-based understandings of understandings of the significance of race and urges the reader to rethink race Native organizations and communities in and class hierarchies as they pertain to drugs addressing and dismantling colonial and crime. traumas that lead to risk of HIV. The author Linnemann proceeds to discuss cultural ends by discussing intergenerational love— work performed by police officers and politi- loving the self and all generations, forgiving, cians. He interviews police officers in rural and channeling anger and concern into and urban settings. After comparing these action. This book might be of interest to any- qualitative interviews, there is evidence of one identifying as MLGBTQ2S and to people a cultural production of space—rural versus studying HIV, public health, or Native Amer- urban—as well as the cultural production of ican government and culture. a methamphetamine imaginary. He makes the case that police are everyday cultural repro- ducers, and this is enhanced by a political Meth Wars: Police, Media, Power,by Travis emphasis on the methamphetamine epidemic. Linnemann. New York: New York Linnemann concludes the book by University Press, 2016. 272 pp. $30.00 detailing how the war on drugs is conflated paper. ISBN: 9781479800025. with the war on terrorism. He relates political rhetoric about the drug war to the rhetoric Throughout Meth Wars: Police, Media, Power, about the war on terror, including key events Travis Linnemann skillfully describes how related to El Chapo and the Sinaloa Cartel. the United States constructs social imagina- Linnemann has insightful comparisons ries. He focuses particularly on the metham- that question the economic and geographic phetamine imaginary and how individuals agenda of the United States and the role nar- and communities view methamphetamine co-terrorism plays in this agenda. within their social world. He discusses Meth Wars: Police, Media, Power can reach how individuals, police, media, and politics a wide variety of individuals, ranging from contribute to the socially constructed idea of policy-makers to police officers to cultural drugs. Linnemann enhances his argument criminologists. The book incorporates topics by incorporating popular media, such as that span multiple areas, including law television series, movies, and news sources. enforcement, politics, pop culture, rural soci- He explains how these drug and crime ology, and cultural criminology. portrayals culturally construct ideas surrounding methamphetamine, and he proceeds to dismantle these ideologies. What They Saw in America: Alexis de Linnemann begins with the popular show Tocqueville, Max Weber, G. K. Chesterton, and Breaking Bad and identifies key themes of Sayyid Qutb,by James L. Nolan, Jr. New social class, poverty, and race that are over- York: Cambridge University Press, 2016. shadowed by methamphetamine. He 299 pp. $27.99 paper. ISBN: 9781316601594. compares the social context and activities of Walter White to those in the United States What They Saw in America gives accounts of and convincingly demonstrates how this journeys taken by four prominent thinkers television series helps develop the metham- from four different countries during four dif- phetamine imaginary. After incorporating ferent time periods in American history. The this popular media example, he turns our subjects and their experiences, observations, attention to anti-meth campaigns through- and critiques allow the reader to view out the United States. These include Faces America through the perspective of a critical of Meth and the Meth Project. He empha- foreign observer. To quote Tocqueville, this sizes how these campaigns invoke fear and narrative is important, as ‘‘only foreigners Contemporary Sociology 47, 3 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Contemporary Sociology: A Journal of Reviews SAGE

Meth Wars: Police, Media, Power

Contemporary Sociology: A Journal of Reviews , Volume 47 (3): 1 – May 1, 2018

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References (1)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© American Sociological Association 2018
ISSN
0094-3061
eISSN
1939-8638
DOI
10.1177/0094306118767652e
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Briefly Noted 383 networks that provide support and healing create a powerful connection between as well as connecting different generations viewers and the drug, thus fueling the meth- of mixed-blood Indians. Jolivette writes that amphetamine imaginary. Within these the model will encourage further develop- campaigns, Linnemann identifies many ment of community-based and scholarly instances of class-based understandings of understandings of the significance of race and urges the reader to rethink race Native organizations and communities in and class hierarchies as they pertain to drugs addressing and dismantling colonial and crime. traumas that lead to risk of HIV. The author Linnemann proceeds to discuss cultural ends by discussing intergenerational love— work performed by police officers and politi- loving the self and all generations, forgiving, cians. He interviews police officers in rural and channeling anger and concern into and urban settings. After comparing these action. This book might be of interest to any- qualitative interviews, there is evidence of one identifying as MLGBTQ2S and to people a cultural production of space—rural versus studying HIV, public health, or Native Amer- urban—as well as the cultural production of ican government and culture. a methamphetamine imaginary. He makes the case that police are everyday cultural repro- ducers, and this is enhanced by a political Meth Wars: Police, Media, Power,by Travis emphasis on the methamphetamine epidemic. Linnemann. New York: New York Linnemann concludes the book by University Press, 2016. 272 pp. $30.00 detailing how the war on drugs is conflated paper. ISBN: 9781479800025. with the war on terrorism. He relates political rhetoric about the drug war to the rhetoric Throughout Meth Wars: Police, Media, Power, about the war on terror, including key events Travis Linnemann skillfully describes how related to El Chapo and the Sinaloa Cartel. the United States constructs social imagina- Linnemann has insightful comparisons ries. He focuses particularly on the metham- that question the economic and geographic phetamine imaginary and how individuals agenda of the United States and the role nar- and communities view methamphetamine co-terrorism plays in this agenda. within their social world. He discusses Meth Wars: Police, Media, Power can reach how individuals, police, media, and politics a wide variety of individuals, ranging from contribute to the socially constructed idea of policy-makers to police officers to cultural drugs. Linnemann enhances his argument criminologists. The book incorporates topics by incorporating popular media, such as that span multiple areas, including law television series, movies, and news sources. enforcement, politics, pop culture, rural soci- He explains how these drug and crime ology, and cultural criminology. portrayals culturally construct ideas surrounding methamphetamine, and he proceeds to dismantle these ideologies. What They Saw in America: Alexis de Linnemann begins with the popular show Tocqueville, Max Weber, G. K. Chesterton, and Breaking Bad and identifies key themes of Sayyid Qutb,by James L. Nolan, Jr. New social class, poverty, and race that are over- York: Cambridge University Press, 2016. shadowed by methamphetamine. He 299 pp. $27.99 paper. ISBN: 9781316601594. compares the social context and activities of Walter White to those in the United States What They Saw in America gives accounts of and convincingly demonstrates how this journeys taken by four prominent thinkers television series helps develop the metham- from four different countries during four dif- phetamine imaginary. After incorporating ferent time periods in American history. The this popular media example, he turns our subjects and their experiences, observations, attention to anti-meth campaigns through- and critiques allow the reader to view out the United States. These include Faces America through the perspective of a critical of Meth and the Meth Project. He empha- foreign observer. To quote Tocqueville, this sizes how these campaigns invoke fear and narrative is important, as ‘‘only foreigners Contemporary Sociology 47, 3

Journal

Contemporary Sociology: A Journal of ReviewsSAGE

Published: May 1, 2018

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