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Missing the story? Changes in foreign news reporting and their implications for conflict prevention

Missing the story? Changes in foreign news reporting and their implications for conflict prevention One consequence of the eroding business model of quality newspapers in Western countries is the reduction in the number of permanent correspondents and regional bureaus. It has been argued that the importance of foreign correspondents has been overstated and that news agencies, social networks and citizen-journalism can fill the gap. In contrast, the authors argue that the loss of presence in foreign countries has harmed the news media’s ability to uncover evolving crises and provide in-depth and reliable background reporting. This is particularly problematic for conflict prevention because decision-makers use quality news media alongside intelligence reports for identifying and prioritizing threats. Cost-considerations stand in the way of re-opening foreign bureaus, but quality news providers need to become more inventive in how they can preserve the early warning function of quality news coverage. One way forward is to cultivate links with country and area specialists from academia, NGOs and the non-profit media. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Media, War & Conflict SAGE

Missing the story? Changes in foreign news reporting and their implications for conflict prevention

Media, War & Conflict , Volume 5 (3): 17 – Dec 1, 2012

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References (7)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2012
ISSN
1750-6352
eISSN
1750-6360
DOI
10.1177/1750635212458621
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

One consequence of the eroding business model of quality newspapers in Western countries is the reduction in the number of permanent correspondents and regional bureaus. It has been argued that the importance of foreign correspondents has been overstated and that news agencies, social networks and citizen-journalism can fill the gap. In contrast, the authors argue that the loss of presence in foreign countries has harmed the news media’s ability to uncover evolving crises and provide in-depth and reliable background reporting. This is particularly problematic for conflict prevention because decision-makers use quality news media alongside intelligence reports for identifying and prioritizing threats. Cost-considerations stand in the way of re-opening foreign bureaus, but quality news providers need to become more inventive in how they can preserve the early warning function of quality news coverage. One way forward is to cultivate links with country and area specialists from academia, NGOs and the non-profit media.

Journal

Media, War & ConflictSAGE

Published: Dec 1, 2012

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