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Mothers' and Fathers' Reports of the Effects of a Young Child with Special Needs on the Family

Mothers' and Fathers' Reports of the Effects of a Young Child with Special Needs on the Family This study examined the effects on the family as reported by 48 mothers and 35 fathers of young children with special needs. The Family Support Scale (FSS), Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scales (FACES III), and Comprehensive Evaluation of Family Functioning Scale (CEFF) were administered to assess (1) social support, (2) family satisfaction, and (3) impact, respectively. CEFF items cited as problems by 30% or more of mothers and fathers were identified. Statistically significant differences were found between mothers' and fathers' responses on the CEFF subscales of Time Demands, Coping, and Well-Being. No statistically significant differences were found on the CEFF problem scores or on the FSS or FACES III. These results have implications for the types of services programs may provide to different family members. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Early Intervention SAGE

Mothers' and Fathers' Reports of the Effects of a Young Child with Special Needs on the Family

Journal of Early Intervention , Volume 14 (3): 11 – Jul 1, 1990

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References (13)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
1053-8151
eISSN
2154-3992
DOI
10.1177/105381519001400306
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study examined the effects on the family as reported by 48 mothers and 35 fathers of young children with special needs. The Family Support Scale (FSS), Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scales (FACES III), and Comprehensive Evaluation of Family Functioning Scale (CEFF) were administered to assess (1) social support, (2) family satisfaction, and (3) impact, respectively. CEFF items cited as problems by 30% or more of mothers and fathers were identified. Statistically significant differences were found between mothers' and fathers' responses on the CEFF subscales of Time Demands, Coping, and Well-Being. No statistically significant differences were found on the CEFF problem scores or on the FSS or FACES III. These results have implications for the types of services programs may provide to different family members.

Journal

Journal of Early InterventionSAGE

Published: Jul 1, 1990

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