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Negative Trends, Possible Selves, and Behavior Change

Negative Trends, Possible Selves, and Behavior Change This study uses Stein and Markus’ (1996) self-concept and behavior changeframework to examine youth offenders’ responses to individual-leveltreatment in a residential correctional facility. The authors analysed transcriptscollected from 10 male offenders, aged 15-17, who were interviewed at least threetimes over a period of four to six months. Results showed that while many offenderswere able to identify negative trends in their life that led to their criminalbehavior, other cognitively filtered out self-defeating information and did notidentify troubling life patterns. Offenders also articulated visions of hoped forselves that were anchored in their lived experiences with positive role models andfeared the selves that they might become if they continued down a criminal path.However, nearly all of the offenders had loosely organized or vague strategies forachieving their hoped for or idealized selves. Based on these findings, the authorspose implications for self-concept theory and for treatment practices with thispopulation group. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Qualitative Social Work: Research and Practice SAGE

Negative Trends, Possible Selves, and Behavior Change

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References (20)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
1473-3250
eISSN
1741-3117
DOI
10.1177/1473325005052392
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study uses Stein and Markus’ (1996) self-concept and behavior changeframework to examine youth offenders’ responses to individual-leveltreatment in a residential correctional facility. The authors analysed transcriptscollected from 10 male offenders, aged 15-17, who were interviewed at least threetimes over a period of four to six months. Results showed that while many offenderswere able to identify negative trends in their life that led to their criminalbehavior, other cognitively filtered out self-defeating information and did notidentify troubling life patterns. Offenders also articulated visions of hoped forselves that were anchored in their lived experiences with positive role models andfeared the selves that they might become if they continued down a criminal path.However, nearly all of the offenders had loosely organized or vague strategies forachieving their hoped for or idealized selves. Based on these findings, the authorspose implications for self-concept theory and for treatment practices with thispopulation group.

Journal

Qualitative Social Work: Research and PracticeSAGE

Published: Jun 1, 2005

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