Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Subscribe now for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Network Structure of an Industrial Cluster: Electronics in Toronto

Network Structure of an Industrial Cluster: Electronics in Toronto The literature on the theory of regional industrial success, including that focused on regional innovation systems, provides the conceptual foundation for this exploration of the extent to which firms in clusters of advanced technology industry depend on interregional sources for a wide variety of knowledge inputs to support innovation. The substantive focus is the electronics cluster of the Toronto region, Canada's largest manufacturing center. A small, stratified sample of establishments drawn from this cluster is used to verify the importance of external sources of material inputs, and other knowledge sources, and the strength of distant market connections. Interregional and local collaboration vary in importance as a result of scale-dependent resource differences between firms and in response to choices associated with foreign rather than domestic ownership. The results support the rejection of simple models of clusters and learning regions in which internal connections are privileged over interregional and international transactions operating either between or within firms. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environment and Planning A SAGE

Network Structure of an Industrial Cluster: Electronics in Toronto

Environment and Planning A , Volume 35 (6): 24 – Jun 1, 2003

Loading next page...
 
/lp/sage/network-structure-of-an-industrial-cluster-electronics-in-toronto-ulTgvnpsRC

References (133)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2003 SAGE Publications
ISSN
0308-518X
eISSN
1472-3409
DOI
10.1068/a35290
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The literature on the theory of regional industrial success, including that focused on regional innovation systems, provides the conceptual foundation for this exploration of the extent to which firms in clusters of advanced technology industry depend on interregional sources for a wide variety of knowledge inputs to support innovation. The substantive focus is the electronics cluster of the Toronto region, Canada's largest manufacturing center. A small, stratified sample of establishments drawn from this cluster is used to verify the importance of external sources of material inputs, and other knowledge sources, and the strength of distant market connections. Interregional and local collaboration vary in importance as a result of scale-dependent resource differences between firms and in response to choices associated with foreign rather than domestic ownership. The results support the rejection of simple models of clusters and learning regions in which internal connections are privileged over interregional and international transactions operating either between or within firms.

Journal

Environment and Planning ASAGE

Published: Jun 1, 2003

There are no references for this article.