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Ontological security, self-articulation and the securitization of identity

Ontological security, self-articulation and the securitization of identity The concept of ontological security has made increasing headway within International Relations, in particular through its ability to offer alternative explanations of the forces underpinning security dilemmas and conflict in world politics. While welcoming the insights already provided by its application, this article argues that the concept’s use to date has been too much geared to questions of identity-related stability, with change viewed as disturbing and anxiety-inducing. In contrast, the article calls for a more open understanding that: (i) links ontological security to reflexivity and avoids collapsing together the concepts of self, identity and ontological security; (ii) avoids privileging securitization over desecuritization as a means for generating ontological security; and (iii) opens out the concept beyond a narrow concern with questions of conflict and the conduct of violence more towards the theorization of positive change. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Cooperation and Conflict SAGE

Ontological security, self-articulation and the securitization of identity

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References (39)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2016
ISSN
0010-8367
eISSN
1460-3691
DOI
10.1177/0010836716653161
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The concept of ontological security has made increasing headway within International Relations, in particular through its ability to offer alternative explanations of the forces underpinning security dilemmas and conflict in world politics. While welcoming the insights already provided by its application, this article argues that the concept’s use to date has been too much geared to questions of identity-related stability, with change viewed as disturbing and anxiety-inducing. In contrast, the article calls for a more open understanding that: (i) links ontological security to reflexivity and avoids collapsing together the concepts of self, identity and ontological security; (ii) avoids privileging securitization over desecuritization as a means for generating ontological security; and (iii) opens out the concept beyond a narrow concern with questions of conflict and the conduct of violence more towards the theorization of positive change.

Journal

Cooperation and ConflictSAGE

Published: Mar 1, 2017

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