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Parenthood, policy and work-family time in Australia 1992—2006

Parenthood, policy and work-family time in Australia 1992—2006 This article explores how having children impacted upon (a) paid work, domestic work and childcare (total workload) and (b) the gender division of labour in Australia over a 15-year period during which government changed from the progressive Labor Party to the socially conservative National/Liberal Party Coalition. It describes changes and continuity in government policies and rhetoric about work, family and gender issues and trends in workforce participation. Data from three successive nationally representative Time Use Surveys (1992, 1997 and 2006), N=3846, are analysed. The difference between parents’ and non-parents’ total workload grew substantially under both governments, especially for women. In households with children there was a nascent trend to gender convergence in paid and unpaid work under Labor, which reversed under the Coalition. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Work, Employment and Society SAGE

Parenthood, policy and work-family time in Australia 1992—2006

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References (48)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2010,
ISSN
0950-0170
eISSN
1469-8722
DOI
10.1177/0950017009353778
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article explores how having children impacted upon (a) paid work, domestic work and childcare (total workload) and (b) the gender division of labour in Australia over a 15-year period during which government changed from the progressive Labor Party to the socially conservative National/Liberal Party Coalition. It describes changes and continuity in government policies and rhetoric about work, family and gender issues and trends in workforce participation. Data from three successive nationally representative Time Use Surveys (1992, 1997 and 2006), N=3846, are analysed. The difference between parents’ and non-parents’ total workload grew substantially under both governments, especially for women. In households with children there was a nascent trend to gender convergence in paid and unpaid work under Labor, which reversed under the Coalition.

Journal

Work, Employment and SocietySAGE

Published: Mar 1, 2010

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