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Political Incorporation among Immigrants from Ten Areas of Origin: The Persistence of Source Country Effects

Political Incorporation among Immigrants from Ten Areas of Origin: The Persistence of Source... Using four years of data from the Current Population Survey, this study examines the effect of country of origin on two types of political incorporation among immigrants – citizenship and voting – in the contemporary United States. Results show that country of origin is a statistically significant predictor of citizenship acquisition for nine of ten immigrant groups and for voter turnout for five of ten groups, net of income, education, length of residence in the United States, and other demographic characteristics. The findings also suggest that country of origin matters as much for how it interacts with other key characteristics, such as education and income, as for the independent influence it exerts on these two political processes. For immigrants from most countries under examination, lower levels of education and income discourage citizenship acquisition. An exception is found among Britons, for whom lower levels of income encourages naturalizing. In the voting process, higher levels of education encourage voter turnout for most immigrant groups. Though country of origin has a greater effect on naturalizing than on voting, it significantly impacts both types of political incorporation. The differing effects of country of origin and other demographic factors on naturalizing and voting, respectively, suggest the two processes are distinct from one another. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Migration Review SAGE

Political Incorporation among Immigrants from Ten Areas of Origin: The Persistence of Source Country Effects

International Migration Review , Volume 39 (1): 38 – Mar 1, 2005

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References (48)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2005 Center for Migration Studies
ISSN
0197-9183
eISSN
1747-7379
DOI
10.1111/j.1747-7379.2005.tb00257.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Using four years of data from the Current Population Survey, this study examines the effect of country of origin on two types of political incorporation among immigrants – citizenship and voting – in the contemporary United States. Results show that country of origin is a statistically significant predictor of citizenship acquisition for nine of ten immigrant groups and for voter turnout for five of ten groups, net of income, education, length of residence in the United States, and other demographic characteristics. The findings also suggest that country of origin matters as much for how it interacts with other key characteristics, such as education and income, as for the independent influence it exerts on these two political processes. For immigrants from most countries under examination, lower levels of education and income discourage citizenship acquisition. An exception is found among Britons, for whom lower levels of income encourages naturalizing. In the voting process, higher levels of education encourage voter turnout for most immigrant groups. Though country of origin has a greater effect on naturalizing than on voting, it significantly impacts both types of political incorporation. The differing effects of country of origin and other demographic factors on naturalizing and voting, respectively, suggest the two processes are distinct from one another.

Journal

International Migration ReviewSAGE

Published: Mar 1, 2005

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