Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Political Science and the Three New Institutionalisms

Political Science and the Three New Institutionalisms Political Studies (1996), XLIV, 936-957 Political Science and the Three New Inst i t u tionalisms* PETER A. HALL Harvard University AND ROSEMARY C. R. TAYLOR Tufts University The ‘new institutionalism’ is a term that now appears with growing frequency in political science. However, there is considerable confusion about just what the ‘new institutionalism’ is, how it differs from other approaches, and what sort of promise or problems it displays. The object of this essay is to provide some preliminary answers to these questions by reviewing recent work in a burgeon- ing literature. Some of the ambiguities surrounding the new institutionalism can be dispelled if we recognize that it does not constitute a unified body of thought. Instead, at least three different analytical approaches, each of which calls itself a ‘new institutionalism’, have appeared over the past fifteen years. We label these three schools of thought: historical institutionalism, rational choice institu- tionalism, and sociological institutionalism.’ All of these approaches developed in reaction to the behavioural perspectives that were influential during the 1960s and 1970s and all seek to elucidate the role that institutions play in the determination of social and political outcomes. However, they paint quite different pictures of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Political Science SAGE

Political Science and the Three New Institutionalisms

Political Science , Volume 44 (5): 22 – Dec 1, 1996

Loading next page...
 
/lp/sage/political-science-and-the-three-new-institutionalisms-wBTNwgHLjj

References (100)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 1996 Political Studies Association
ISSN
0032-3187
eISSN
2041-0611
DOI
10.1111/j.1467-9248.1996.tb00343.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Political Studies (1996), XLIV, 936-957 Political Science and the Three New Inst i t u tionalisms* PETER A. HALL Harvard University AND ROSEMARY C. R. TAYLOR Tufts University The ‘new institutionalism’ is a term that now appears with growing frequency in political science. However, there is considerable confusion about just what the ‘new institutionalism’ is, how it differs from other approaches, and what sort of promise or problems it displays. The object of this essay is to provide some preliminary answers to these questions by reviewing recent work in a burgeon- ing literature. Some of the ambiguities surrounding the new institutionalism can be dispelled if we recognize that it does not constitute a unified body of thought. Instead, at least three different analytical approaches, each of which calls itself a ‘new institutionalism’, have appeared over the past fifteen years. We label these three schools of thought: historical institutionalism, rational choice institu- tionalism, and sociological institutionalism.’ All of these approaches developed in reaction to the behavioural perspectives that were influential during the 1960s and 1970s and all seek to elucidate the role that institutions play in the determination of social and political outcomes. However, they paint quite different pictures of

Journal

Political ScienceSAGE

Published: Dec 1, 1996

There are no references for this article.