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Problem Solving as a Basis for Reform in Curriculum and Instruction: The Case of Mathematics

Problem Solving as a Basis for Reform in Curriculum and Instruction: The Case of Mathematics We argue that reform in curriculum and instruction should be based on allowing students to problematize the subject. Rather than mastering skills and applying them, students should be engaged in resolving problems. In mathematics, this principle fits under the umbrella of problem solving, but our interpretation is different from many problem-solving approaches. We first note that the history of problem solving in the curriculum has been infused with a distinction between acquiring knowledge and applying it. We then propose our alternative principle by building on John Dewey’s idea of “reflective inquiry,” argue that such an approach would facilitate students’ understanding, and compare our proposal with other views on the role of problem solving in the curriculum. We close by considering several common dichotomies that take on a different meaning from this perspective http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Educational Researcher SAGE

Problem Solving as a Basis for Reform in Curriculum and Instruction: The Case of Mathematics

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References (79)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
0013-189X
eISSN
1935-102X
DOI
10.3102/0013189X025004012
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We argue that reform in curriculum and instruction should be based on allowing students to problematize the subject. Rather than mastering skills and applying them, students should be engaged in resolving problems. In mathematics, this principle fits under the umbrella of problem solving, but our interpretation is different from many problem-solving approaches. We first note that the history of problem solving in the curriculum has been infused with a distinction between acquiring knowledge and applying it. We then propose our alternative principle by building on John Dewey’s idea of “reflective inquiry,” argue that such an approach would facilitate students’ understanding, and compare our proposal with other views on the role of problem solving in the curriculum. We close by considering several common dichotomies that take on a different meaning from this perspective

Journal

Educational ResearcherSAGE

Published: May 1, 1996

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