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Qualitative Research and Institutional Review Boards

Qualitative Research and Institutional Review Boards Although it is not their intention, institutional review boards (IRBs) often impede the conduct of studies that are not conventional and/or experimental designs. As a consequence, studies that are qualitative, participatory action research, action research, postmodern, and/or critical theorist in orientation often undergo endless revisions as IRBs seek to make them appear more conventional. Among the reasons for this are lack of training in alternative epistemologies and/or paradigms for conducting research, lack of understanding the kinds of data that will be generated by these studies, and occasionally, prejudice on the part of members of the boards regarding what constitutes sound research. Several actual case studies are reported, and a variety of strategies for addressing IRBs’ concerns are proposed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Qualitative Inquiry SAGE

Qualitative Research and Institutional Review Boards

Qualitative Inquiry , Volume 10 (2): 16 – Apr 1, 2004

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References (12)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
1077-8004
eISSN
1552-7565
DOI
10.1177/1077800403262361
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Although it is not their intention, institutional review boards (IRBs) often impede the conduct of studies that are not conventional and/or experimental designs. As a consequence, studies that are qualitative, participatory action research, action research, postmodern, and/or critical theorist in orientation often undergo endless revisions as IRBs seek to make them appear more conventional. Among the reasons for this are lack of training in alternative epistemologies and/or paradigms for conducting research, lack of understanding the kinds of data that will be generated by these studies, and occasionally, prejudice on the part of members of the boards regarding what constitutes sound research. Several actual case studies are reported, and a variety of strategies for addressing IRBs’ concerns are proposed.

Journal

Qualitative InquirySAGE

Published: Apr 1, 2004

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