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Reexamining Evidence-Based Practice in Community Corrections: Beyond “A-Confined View” of What Works

Reexamining Evidence-Based Practice in Community Corrections: Beyond “A-Confined View” of What Works This article aims to reexamine the development and scope of evidence-based practice (EBP) in community corrections by exploring three sets of issues. Firstly, we examine the relationships between the contested purposes of community supervision and their relationships to questions of evidence. Secondly, we explore the range of forms of evidence that might inform the pursuit of one purpose of supervision—the rehabilitation of offenders—making the case for a fuller engagement with “desistance” research in supporting this process. Thirdly, we examine who can and should be involved in conversations about EBP, arguing that both ex/offenders' and practitioners' voices need to be respected and heard in this debate. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Justice Research and Policy SAGE

Reexamining Evidence-Based Practice in Community Corrections: Beyond “A-Confined View” of What Works

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References (96)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2012 SAGE Publications
ISSN
1525-1071
eISSN
1942-8022
DOI
10.3818/JRP.14.1.2012.35
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article aims to reexamine the development and scope of evidence-based practice (EBP) in community corrections by exploring three sets of issues. Firstly, we examine the relationships between the contested purposes of community supervision and their relationships to questions of evidence. Secondly, we explore the range of forms of evidence that might inform the pursuit of one purpose of supervision—the rehabilitation of offenders—making the case for a fuller engagement with “desistance” research in supporting this process. Thirdly, we examine who can and should be involved in conversations about EBP, arguing that both ex/offenders' and practitioners' voices need to be respected and heard in this debate.

Journal

Justice Research and PolicySAGE

Published: Jun 1, 2012

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