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Reviews: The Right to the City: Social Justice and the Fight for Public Space, the Enchantment of Modern Life: Attachments, Crossings and Ethics

Reviews: The Right to the City: Social Justice and the Fight for Public Space, the Enchantment of... Environment and Planning D: Society and Space 2004, volume 22, pages 791 ^ 794 Reviews The right to the city: social justice and the fight for public space by D Mitchell; Guilford Press, 2003, New York, 270 pages, $23.00 paper (»17.50) ISBN 1572 30 847 8 Don Mitchell describes this book as being about an `idea' (page 4), about who belongs in the public spaces of our cities, or, about who has `the right to the city'? But it is perhaps more precise to say that this book is about an `ideal', or rather the ideals of inclusion, social justice, and democracy. Then again, it may be even better described as a condemnation of the failure of the practices constitutive of contemporary urban public space to realize the ideals of inclusion, justice, and democracy. Organizing the book around Henri Lefebvre's concept of `the right to the city', Mitchell insists that the city be seen as the collective oeuvre of its inhabitants that is daily made (and remade) through their modes of living. For Mitchell, as with Lefebvre, `the right to the city' is a normative `cry and demand' for the right to the active appropriation and production of everyday http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environment and Planning D SAGE

Reviews: The Right to the City: Social Justice and the Fight for Public Space, the Enchantment of Modern Life: Attachments, Crossings and Ethics

Environment and Planning D , Volume 22 (5): 4 – Oct 1, 2004

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References (5)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2004 SAGE Publications
ISSN
0263-7758
eISSN
1472-3433
DOI
10.1068/d2205rvw
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Environment and Planning D: Society and Space 2004, volume 22, pages 791 ^ 794 Reviews The right to the city: social justice and the fight for public space by D Mitchell; Guilford Press, 2003, New York, 270 pages, $23.00 paper (»17.50) ISBN 1572 30 847 8 Don Mitchell describes this book as being about an `idea' (page 4), about who belongs in the public spaces of our cities, or, about who has `the right to the city'? But it is perhaps more precise to say that this book is about an `ideal', or rather the ideals of inclusion, social justice, and democracy. Then again, it may be even better described as a condemnation of the failure of the practices constitutive of contemporary urban public space to realize the ideals of inclusion, justice, and democracy. Organizing the book around Henri Lefebvre's concept of `the right to the city', Mitchell insists that the city be seen as the collective oeuvre of its inhabitants that is daily made (and remade) through their modes of living. For Mitchell, as with Lefebvre, `the right to the city' is a normative `cry and demand' for the right to the active appropriation and production of everyday

Journal

Environment and Planning DSAGE

Published: Oct 1, 2004

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