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RMIT Vietnam and Vietnam’s Development: Risk and Responsibility

RMIT Vietnam and Vietnam’s Development: Risk and Responsibility To help bridge the gap between demand and supply for tertiary education, Vietnam has opened to direct, foreign providers, and the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT) International University Vietnam is the first of this category. By sponsoring a large project in a country that some see as risky, RMIT Vietnam needs to be triply viable. Financially, it relies on fees, so its programs must be effective and affordable. Environmentally, with its second campus in an estuarine environment near the centre of Ho Chi Minh City, it must demonstrate sustainable development and show new ways to develop learning and research environments. Socially and culturally, it must provide opportunities for the disadvantaged and engage with local communities. RMIT Vietnam is engaging directly in community partnerships and local projects, providing scholarships for disadvantaged students, and assisting with capacity building for local universities. In an emerging economy, such a market-reliant university can contribute to poverty alleviation and sustainable development. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Studies in International Education SAGE

RMIT Vietnam and Vietnam’s Development: Risk and Responsibility

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References (29)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
1028-3153
eISSN
1552-7808
DOI
10.1177/1028315303260829
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

To help bridge the gap between demand and supply for tertiary education, Vietnam has opened to direct, foreign providers, and the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT) International University Vietnam is the first of this category. By sponsoring a large project in a country that some see as risky, RMIT Vietnam needs to be triply viable. Financially, it relies on fees, so its programs must be effective and affordable. Environmentally, with its second campus in an estuarine environment near the centre of Ho Chi Minh City, it must demonstrate sustainable development and show new ways to develop learning and research environments. Socially and culturally, it must provide opportunities for the disadvantaged and engage with local communities. RMIT Vietnam is engaging directly in community partnerships and local projects, providing scholarships for disadvantaged students, and assisting with capacity building for local universities. In an emerging economy, such a market-reliant university can contribute to poverty alleviation and sustainable development.

Journal

Journal of Studies in International EducationSAGE

Published: Jun 1, 2004

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