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Short Cycle Higher Education: A Search for Identity

Short Cycle Higher Education: A Search for Identity Short Cycle Higher Education: Search for Identity Frederick C. Kintzer As the decade of the '80s opens, postsecondary education systems the world over are facing a series of difficult and complex issues. In- tensified by the rapid resurgence of demand for higher education but diminishing resources, these have developed to severe proportions in many nations. Developing relevant curricula for an expanded citizenry in an era of spiraling inflation continues to be a critically important obligation for many, and survival for some. Part-time adults, called "the new majority" in the United States, are replacing the 18- to 22-year-olds who were formerly the mainstays of the entering university population. Remarkable demographic changes characterize "the new majority." Women now constitute 52 percent of the part-time student group and 46 percent of full-time students. due to the increase of Partially rapid low-cost, conveniently located two-year colleges and an improving economic pay-off for women graduates, this explosive growth is likely to con- tinue. The new clientele is heavily recruited by traditional and non- traditional schools alike. Problems of Accommodation: The shift in attention to "the new majority," based in part on the need to regain enrollment levels of the last decade, poses problems of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Community College Review SAGE

Short Cycle Higher Education: A Search for Identity

Community College Review , Volume 8 (1): 7 – Jul 1, 1980

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References (17)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
0091-5521
eISSN
1940-2325
DOI
10.1177/009155218000800102
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Short Cycle Higher Education: Search for Identity Frederick C. Kintzer As the decade of the '80s opens, postsecondary education systems the world over are facing a series of difficult and complex issues. In- tensified by the rapid resurgence of demand for higher education but diminishing resources, these have developed to severe proportions in many nations. Developing relevant curricula for an expanded citizenry in an era of spiraling inflation continues to be a critically important obligation for many, and survival for some. Part-time adults, called "the new majority" in the United States, are replacing the 18- to 22-year-olds who were formerly the mainstays of the entering university population. Remarkable demographic changes characterize "the new majority." Women now constitute 52 percent of the part-time student group and 46 percent of full-time students. due to the increase of Partially rapid low-cost, conveniently located two-year colleges and an improving economic pay-off for women graduates, this explosive growth is likely to con- tinue. The new clientele is heavily recruited by traditional and non- traditional schools alike. Problems of Accommodation: The shift in attention to "the new majority," based in part on the need to regain enrollment levels of the last decade, poses problems of

Journal

Community College ReviewSAGE

Published: Jul 1, 1980

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