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Shorter Stay, Longer Life: Age at Migration and Mortality Among the Older Mexican-Origin Population

Shorter Stay, Longer Life: Age at Migration and Mortality Among the Older Mexican-Origin Population Objectives: In this article, we investigate the association between age at migration and mortality during a 13-year period in a sample of Mexican American immigrants 65 and older at baseline. Method: We employ the Hispanic Established Populations for Epidemiologic Studies of the Elderly (H-PESE) to control for mortality-related health and social factors. Results: Our analyses show that the immigrant generation does not represent a homogeneous mortality risk category. Individuals who migrated to the United States in mature adulthood have a considerably lower risk of death than individuals who migrated in childhood or midlife. Chronic conditions or functional capacity do not account for these differences. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that standard risk pools may differ significantly on the basis of genetic and unmeasured life-course factors. A better understanding of the late-life immigrant mortality advantage has important implications for more effective and targeted social and medical interventions. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Aging and Health SAGE

Shorter Stay, Longer Life: Age at Migration and Mortality Among the Older Mexican-Origin Population

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References (46)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2010
ISSN
0898-2643
eISSN
1552-6887
DOI
10.1177/0898264310376540
pmid
20682948
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Objectives: In this article, we investigate the association between age at migration and mortality during a 13-year period in a sample of Mexican American immigrants 65 and older at baseline. Method: We employ the Hispanic Established Populations for Epidemiologic Studies of the Elderly (H-PESE) to control for mortality-related health and social factors. Results: Our analyses show that the immigrant generation does not represent a homogeneous mortality risk category. Individuals who migrated to the United States in mature adulthood have a considerably lower risk of death than individuals who migrated in childhood or midlife. Chronic conditions or functional capacity do not account for these differences. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that standard risk pools may differ significantly on the basis of genetic and unmeasured life-course factors. A better understanding of the late-life immigrant mortality advantage has important implications for more effective and targeted social and medical interventions.

Journal

Journal of Aging and HealthSAGE

Published: Oct 1, 2010

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