Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Subscribe now for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Slouching Toward Bork

Slouching Toward Bork JOURNAL Ogbar / SLOUCHING OF BLACK TOWARD STUDIESBORK / NOVEMBER 1999 The Culture Wars and Self-Criticism in Hip-Hop Music JEFFREY O. G. OGBAR University of Connecticut The appeal of hip-hop and rap music in the United States grew considerably in the early 1990s. A dynamic culture that had its beginnings among working class African Americans and Puerto Ricans in New York, hip-hop evolved into a multimillion-dollar industry with far-reaching influences in marketing, popular cul- ture, and politics. Coterminous with this rise in popularity was the emergence of a highly visible campaign against rap artists for pro- moting offensive and socially irresponsible music. These attacks were the most visible battles in America’s “culture wars” that pitted cultural critics against each other in the realms of music, cinema, and visual arts. Peaking in the years 1992 through 1996, this public discourse regarding cultural standards and hip-hop involved presi- dential candidates, congressmen, and academics who joined the chorus to condemn what they considered violent, sexist, and big- oted rap. Few, however, in the mainstream media or academia gave attention to the many in the hip-hop community who were also involved in the debates. In fact, many rap artists offered fresh analy- ses http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Black Studies SAGE

Slouching Toward Bork

Journal of Black Studies , Volume 30 (2): 20 – Nov 1, 1999

Loading next page...
 
/lp/sage/slouching-toward-bork-zWJVfWFrOA

References (21)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
0021-9347
eISSN
1552-4566
DOI
10.1177/002193479903000202
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

JOURNAL Ogbar / SLOUCHING OF BLACK TOWARD STUDIESBORK / NOVEMBER 1999 The Culture Wars and Self-Criticism in Hip-Hop Music JEFFREY O. G. OGBAR University of Connecticut The appeal of hip-hop and rap music in the United States grew considerably in the early 1990s. A dynamic culture that had its beginnings among working class African Americans and Puerto Ricans in New York, hip-hop evolved into a multimillion-dollar industry with far-reaching influences in marketing, popular cul- ture, and politics. Coterminous with this rise in popularity was the emergence of a highly visible campaign against rap artists for pro- moting offensive and socially irresponsible music. These attacks were the most visible battles in America’s “culture wars” that pitted cultural critics against each other in the realms of music, cinema, and visual arts. Peaking in the years 1992 through 1996, this public discourse regarding cultural standards and hip-hop involved presi- dential candidates, congressmen, and academics who joined the chorus to condemn what they considered violent, sexist, and big- oted rap. Few, however, in the mainstream media or academia gave attention to the many in the hip-hop community who were also involved in the debates. In fact, many rap artists offered fresh analy- ses

Journal

Journal of Black StudiesSAGE

Published: Nov 1, 1999

There are no references for this article.