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Spatial Relations and Housing Policy: Regulations that Discriminate Against Mexican-origin Households

Spatial Relations and Housing Policy: Regulations that Discriminate Against Mexican-origin... Local, state, and federal housing policies define bedroom and acceptable sleeping arrangements. While often considered universal, such spatial relations actually are inextricably entwined with societal values. Many seemingly neutral housing policies designed to protect health, safety, and welfare, in fact often protect dominant values and morals, not physical or emotional well-being of nondominant groups. Consequently they discriminate against the latter. Here, Mexican and U.S. domestic spatial relations are compared within their larger conceptual frameworks to explain some sociocultural bases for these regulations, questioning their applicability. The study concludes that a combined anthropological/planning approach is important for analyzing and developing policy generally. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Planning Education and Research SAGE

Spatial Relations and Housing Policy: Regulations that Discriminate Against Mexican-origin Households

Journal of Planning Education and Research , Volume 13 (2): 17 – Jan 1, 1994

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References (7)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
0739-456X
eISSN
1552-6577
DOI
10.1177/0739456X9401300204
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Local, state, and federal housing policies define bedroom and acceptable sleeping arrangements. While often considered universal, such spatial relations actually are inextricably entwined with societal values. Many seemingly neutral housing policies designed to protect health, safety, and welfare, in fact often protect dominant values and morals, not physical or emotional well-being of nondominant groups. Consequently they discriminate against the latter. Here, Mexican and U.S. domestic spatial relations are compared within their larger conceptual frameworks to explain some sociocultural bases for these regulations, questioning their applicability. The study concludes that a combined anthropological/planning approach is important for analyzing and developing policy generally.

Journal

Journal of Planning Education and ResearchSAGE

Published: Jan 1, 1994

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