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The Affective Turn

The Affective Turn 001-022 085156 Clough (D) 29/2/08 13:44 Page 1 Political Economy, Biomedia and Bodies Patricia T. Clough HEN IN the early to mid-1990s, critical theorists and cultural critics invited a turn to affect, they often did so in response to what Wthey argued were limitations of post-structuralism and deconstruc- tion. As Rei Terada would suggest, there was a growing sense that post- structuralism generally but deconstruction in particular were ‘truly glacial’ in the pronouncement of the death of the subject and therefore had little to do with affect and emotion (2001: 4). More accurately, as Terada goes on to argue, the turn to affect and emotion extended discussions about culture, subjectivity, identity and bodies begun in critical theory and cultural criti- cism under the influence of post-structuralism and deconstruction. Affect and emotion, after all, point just as well as post-structuralism and decon- struction do to the subject’s discontinuity with itself, a discontinuity of the subject’s conscious experience with the non-intentionality of emotion and affect. However, the turn to affect did propose a substantive shift in that it returned critical theory and cultural criticism to bodily matter which had been treated in terms of various constructionisms under the influence of post-structuralism http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png "Theory, Culture & Society" SAGE

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References (43)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
0263-2764
eISSN
1460-3616
DOI
10.1177/0263276407085156
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

001-022 085156 Clough (D) 29/2/08 13:44 Page 1 Political Economy, Biomedia and Bodies Patricia T. Clough HEN IN the early to mid-1990s, critical theorists and cultural critics invited a turn to affect, they often did so in response to what Wthey argued were limitations of post-structuralism and deconstruc- tion. As Rei Terada would suggest, there was a growing sense that post- structuralism generally but deconstruction in particular were ‘truly glacial’ in the pronouncement of the death of the subject and therefore had little to do with affect and emotion (2001: 4). More accurately, as Terada goes on to argue, the turn to affect and emotion extended discussions about culture, subjectivity, identity and bodies begun in critical theory and cultural criti- cism under the influence of post-structuralism and deconstruction. Affect and emotion, after all, point just as well as post-structuralism and decon- struction do to the subject’s discontinuity with itself, a discontinuity of the subject’s conscious experience with the non-intentionality of emotion and affect. However, the turn to affect did propose a substantive shift in that it returned critical theory and cultural criticism to bodily matter which had been treated in terms of various constructionisms under the influence of post-structuralism

Journal

"Theory, Culture & Society"SAGE

Published: Jan 1, 2008

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