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The ‘emotionalization of the “war on terror”’: Counter-terrorism, fear, risk, insecurity and helplessness

The ‘emotionalization of the “war on terror”’: Counter-terrorism, fear, risk, insecurity and... The ‘war on terror’ has marked the existence of exceptional measures involving military action abroad and the introduction of counter-terrorism legislation in the United Kingdom. Within this context fear, risk and insecurity have been intrinsic in legitimizing the measures created as being necessary to maintain national security. This article presents the findings from a study investigating the impact of the ‘war on terror’ on British Muslims’ emotions. The study revealed how facets of the ‘war on terror’, including ‘human rights and policing’, ‘What if? and pre-emption’, ‘geopolitics and reflexive fear and risk’ and ‘fear from inside the binary’ impacted participants’ emotions. Through exploring how thepolicy measures implemented in the ‘war on terror’ have influenced British Muslims’ emotions, the article takes a small step in addressing the analytical gap in criminological research on emotions in the ‘war on terror’. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Criminology & Criminal Justice SAGE

The ‘emotionalization of the “war on terror”’: Counter-terrorism, fear, risk, insecurity and helplessness

Criminology & Criminal Justice , Volume 15 (5): 16 – Nov 1, 2015

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References (44)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2015
ISSN
1748-8958
eISSN
1748-8966
DOI
10.1177/1748895815572161
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The ‘war on terror’ has marked the existence of exceptional measures involving military action abroad and the introduction of counter-terrorism legislation in the United Kingdom. Within this context fear, risk and insecurity have been intrinsic in legitimizing the measures created as being necessary to maintain national security. This article presents the findings from a study investigating the impact of the ‘war on terror’ on British Muslims’ emotions. The study revealed how facets of the ‘war on terror’, including ‘human rights and policing’, ‘What if? and pre-emption’, ‘geopolitics and reflexive fear and risk’ and ‘fear from inside the binary’ impacted participants’ emotions. Through exploring how thepolicy measures implemented in the ‘war on terror’ have influenced British Muslims’ emotions, the article takes a small step in addressing the analytical gap in criminological research on emotions in the ‘war on terror’.

Journal

Criminology & Criminal JusticeSAGE

Published: Nov 1, 2015

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