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The Empty Cradle

The Empty Cradle CRADLE THE EMPTY BY GABRIEL VAHANIAN E we really living in a post-Christian era? We would have to think so if we were to believe the reviewers who almost unanimously stabbed Samuel Beckett’s play, Waiting for Godot,’ for what they called its abstruseness and esoteric symbolism clustered about remotely religious reminiscences. It is sad, indeed, and quite ironic to realize that if a despiser of Christianity sets out to show how anachronistic Christianity has be- come, all he has to do is to make use of the more authentic and ex- istential language of Christianity, to weave its images and symbols and legends into the texture of a poem, a play, or a novel. If his work is not understood, he will have proved that Christianity, if it is not quite an atavism, has congealed into a set of symbols and for- mulas which have become alien to the understanding of the educated secularist, and, worse still, have no currency in this so-called Chris- tian culture of ours. Born in Dublin in 1906, from 1928 to 1932 Samuel Beckett taught English in Paris and French in Dublin. He spent the next five years During the next few years travelling. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Theology Today SAGE

The Empty Cradle

Theology Today , Volume 13 (4): 6 – Jan 1, 1957

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References (1)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 1957 SAGE Publications
ISSN
0040-5736
eISSN
2044-2556
DOI
10.1177/004057365701300411
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

CRADLE THE EMPTY BY GABRIEL VAHANIAN E we really living in a post-Christian era? We would have to think so if we were to believe the reviewers who almost unanimously stabbed Samuel Beckett’s play, Waiting for Godot,’ for what they called its abstruseness and esoteric symbolism clustered about remotely religious reminiscences. It is sad, indeed, and quite ironic to realize that if a despiser of Christianity sets out to show how anachronistic Christianity has be- come, all he has to do is to make use of the more authentic and ex- istential language of Christianity, to weave its images and symbols and legends into the texture of a poem, a play, or a novel. If his work is not understood, he will have proved that Christianity, if it is not quite an atavism, has congealed into a set of symbols and for- mulas which have become alien to the understanding of the educated secularist, and, worse still, have no currency in this so-called Chris- tian culture of ours. Born in Dublin in 1906, from 1928 to 1932 Samuel Beckett taught English in Paris and French in Dublin. He spent the next five years During the next few years travelling.

Journal

Theology TodaySAGE

Published: Jan 1, 1957

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