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The Gentrification of Consumption: A View from Manchester

The Gentrification of Consumption: A View from Manchester This article gives some insight into the processes underpinning the exclusion ofsmall traders from of the redevelopment of Manchester after the IRA bombing in1996. This is achieved by drawing upon interviews with former traders of theCorn Exchange. This is a small subsection of a broader set of qualitative datawhich was gathered (between 2001 and 2002) from past and present everyday usersof the Millennium Quarter. I claim that through regeneration the MillenniumQuarter has experienced intense gentrification in which it has been reconfiguredas an exclusive site of consumption (Smith 1996, Zukin 1995) which caters forthe needs of the affluent. This gentrification is not only influenced by themiddle classes who it is designed to attract but by private developers(Hackworth 2002) and often state intervention (Hackworth and Smith 2001). I drawon literature reflecting the experience of American cities (Betancur 2002,Hackworth 2002, Hackworth and Smith 2001, Zukin 1995) and more recent work aboutthe rebuilding of Manchester (Holden 2002, Mellor 2002, Williams 2000). Whilst asignificant body of literature exists regarding British cities (Atkinson 2000,Butler and Robson 2001, Hamnett and Randolph 1984, Robson and Butler 2001,Rosenburg and Watkins 1999) much of this concentrates on housing and residentialareas. This paper is about the Millennium Quarter which is primarily a retailsite in the central urban core and it adds to a growing literature regardingcity centre redevelopment (e.g.; Chatterton and Hollands (2003); Low (2000) Vander Land (this collection). http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Sociological Research Online SAGE

The Gentrification of Consumption: A View from Manchester

Sociological Research Online , Volume 10 (2): 11 – Jul 1, 2005

The Gentrification of Consumption: A View from Manchester

This article gives some insight into the processes underpinning the exclusion of small traders from of the redevelopment of Manchester after the IRA bombing in 1996. This is achieved by drawing upon interviews with former traders of the Corn Exchange. This is a small subsection of a broader set of qualitative data which was gathered (between 2001 and 2002) from past and present everyday users of the Millennium Quarter. I claim that through regeneration the Millennium Quarter has experienced intense gentrification in which it has been reconfigured as an exclusive site of consumption (Smith 1996, Zukin 1995) which caters for the needs of the affluent. This gentrification is not only influenced by the middle classes who it is designed to attract but by private developers (Hackworth 2002) and often state intervention (Hackworth and Smith 2001). I draw on literature reflecting the experience of American cities (Betancur 2002, Hackworth 2002, Hackworth and Smith 2001, Zukin 1995) and more recent work about the rebuilding of Manchester (Holden 2002, Mellor 2002, Williams 2000). Whilst a significant body of literature exists regarding British cities (Atkinson 2000, Butler and Robson 2001, Hamnett and Randolph 1984, Robson and Butler 2001, Rosenburg and Watkins 1999) much of this concentrates on housing and residential areas. This paper is about the Millennium Quarter which is primarily a retail site in the central urban core and it adds to a growing literature regarding city centre redevelopment (e.g.; Chatterton and Hollands (2003); Low (2000) Van der Land (this collection). Keywords: Xx Introduction 1.1 The empirical aspects of this paper are based upon a small population (seven traders) displaced by the IRA bombing in Manchester. The aim is to contextualise their stories of marginalisation and exclusion in terms of broader social change in Manchester. This group from the Corn Exchange shared the common experience of trading within a particular space in the city...
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References (26)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2005 SAGE Publications and the British Sociological Association
eISSN
1360-7804
DOI
10.5153/sro.1099
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article gives some insight into the processes underpinning the exclusion ofsmall traders from of the redevelopment of Manchester after the IRA bombing in1996. This is achieved by drawing upon interviews with former traders of theCorn Exchange. This is a small subsection of a broader set of qualitative datawhich was gathered (between 2001 and 2002) from past and present everyday usersof the Millennium Quarter. I claim that through regeneration the MillenniumQuarter has experienced intense gentrification in which it has been reconfiguredas an exclusive site of consumption (Smith 1996, Zukin 1995) which caters forthe needs of the affluent. This gentrification is not only influenced by themiddle classes who it is designed to attract but by private developers(Hackworth 2002) and often state intervention (Hackworth and Smith 2001). I drawon literature reflecting the experience of American cities (Betancur 2002,Hackworth 2002, Hackworth and Smith 2001, Zukin 1995) and more recent work aboutthe rebuilding of Manchester (Holden 2002, Mellor 2002, Williams 2000). Whilst asignificant body of literature exists regarding British cities (Atkinson 2000,Butler and Robson 2001, Hamnett and Randolph 1984, Robson and Butler 2001,Rosenburg and Watkins 1999) much of this concentrates on housing and residentialareas. This paper is about the Millennium Quarter which is primarily a retailsite in the central urban core and it adds to a growing literature regardingcity centre redevelopment (e.g.; Chatterton and Hollands (2003); Low (2000) Vander Land (this collection).

Journal

Sociological Research OnlineSAGE

Published: Jul 1, 2005

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