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The Health Disparities of Same-sex Cohabitors at the Intersection of Race-ethnicity and Gender

The Health Disparities of Same-sex Cohabitors at the Intersection of Race-ethnicity and Gender We work from a minority stress perspective to theorize health disparities across union status at the intersection of sexual minority status, race-ethnicity, and gender. We use pooled data from the Integrated National Health Interview Surveys (1997–2014) to assess a wide range of health outcomes, including self-rated physical health, psychological distress, and health behaviors. Results suggest that same-sex cohabitors face substantial health disadvantages relative to different-sex married individuals, with little variation by race-ethnicity and gender. Fewer health differences are found for same-sex cohabitors in comparison with both different-sex cohabitors and unpartnered singles, although greater variation by gender and race-ethnicity is found across these comparisons. This study highlights the importance of integrating intersectionality and minority stress theories to guide future research examining sexual minority health disparities. Results suggest that the sexual minority health disadvantage, as well as the potential health boost of same-sex marriage, may depend on the intersection of race-ethnicity and gender. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Sociological Perspectives SAGE

The Health Disparities of Same-sex Cohabitors at the Intersection of Race-ethnicity and Gender

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References (75)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2016
ISSN
0731-1214
eISSN
1533-8673
DOI
10.1177/0731121416663685
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We work from a minority stress perspective to theorize health disparities across union status at the intersection of sexual minority status, race-ethnicity, and gender. We use pooled data from the Integrated National Health Interview Surveys (1997–2014) to assess a wide range of health outcomes, including self-rated physical health, psychological distress, and health behaviors. Results suggest that same-sex cohabitors face substantial health disadvantages relative to different-sex married individuals, with little variation by race-ethnicity and gender. Fewer health differences are found for same-sex cohabitors in comparison with both different-sex cohabitors and unpartnered singles, although greater variation by gender and race-ethnicity is found across these comparisons. This study highlights the importance of integrating intersectionality and minority stress theories to guide future research examining sexual minority health disparities. Results suggest that the sexual minority health disadvantage, as well as the potential health boost of same-sex marriage, may depend on the intersection of race-ethnicity and gender.

Journal

Sociological PerspectivesSAGE

Published: Jun 1, 2017

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