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The Kingdom Within: Radical Religious Culture and the Politics of Paradise Regained

The Kingdom Within: Radical Religious Culture and the Politics of Paradise Regained The Kingdom Within: Radical Religious Culture and the Politics of Paradise Regained David Loewenstein University of Wisconsin, Madison 'Christ hath a government of his own', Milton wrote in 1659, 'it governs not by outward force . .. it deals only with the inward man and his actions ... [it shows us] the divine excellence of his spiritual kingdom, able without worldly force to subdue all the powers and kingdoms of this world') And a year later, the Quaker prophet Edward Burrough told the saints that 'in the Day of Temptations and Tryals' they should 'put on strength, that you may stand, and never be moved from the hope of Eternal Life, and feel the renewing of your inward man'.2 These two passages, written close to the Restoration, capture essential qualities dramatized in Milton's last spiritual epic: its striking revision of external forms of politics and kingship; its emphasis on the mighty power of a spiritual kingdom within; and its depiction of Jesus as a pious and inward saint, armed with the power of the Lord and unmoved in the midst of the greatest worldly temptations. Yet despite recent attempts to address the political implications of Paradise Regained, no critical http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Literature & History SAGE

The Kingdom Within: Radical Religious Culture and the Politics of Paradise Regained

Literature & History , Volume 3 (2): 27 – Sep 1, 1994

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References (42)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 1994 SAGE Publications
ISSN
0306-1973
eISSN
2050-4594
DOI
10.1177/030619739400300206
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Kingdom Within: Radical Religious Culture and the Politics of Paradise Regained David Loewenstein University of Wisconsin, Madison 'Christ hath a government of his own', Milton wrote in 1659, 'it governs not by outward force . .. it deals only with the inward man and his actions ... [it shows us] the divine excellence of his spiritual kingdom, able without worldly force to subdue all the powers and kingdoms of this world') And a year later, the Quaker prophet Edward Burrough told the saints that 'in the Day of Temptations and Tryals' they should 'put on strength, that you may stand, and never be moved from the hope of Eternal Life, and feel the renewing of your inward man'.2 These two passages, written close to the Restoration, capture essential qualities dramatized in Milton's last spiritual epic: its striking revision of external forms of politics and kingship; its emphasis on the mighty power of a spiritual kingdom within; and its depiction of Jesus as a pious and inward saint, armed with the power of the Lord and unmoved in the midst of the greatest worldly temptations. Yet despite recent attempts to address the political implications of Paradise Regained, no critical

Journal

Literature & HistorySAGE

Published: Sep 1, 1994

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