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The Normalization of Violence in Heterosexual Romantic Relationships: Women's Narratives of Love and Violence

The Normalization of Violence in Heterosexual Romantic Relationships: Women's Narratives of Love... Inductive analysis of in-depth interviews with 20 heterosexual women who had been in violent romantic relationships illuminated women's use of gender and romance narratives to make sense of violent relationships. All participants placed themselves within western culture's primary gender narrative, which prescribes and normalizes dominance and superiority for men and deference and dependence for women. Participants also relied on romance narratives - which entailed both fairy tale and dark versions - to make sense of violence in their relationships. Interrelated beliefs that emerged in the women's talk functioned to legitimize both fairy tale and dark romance narratives. This study highlights the urgency of weaving alternative gender and romance narratives into the structures and practices of the culture. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Social and Personal Relationships SAGE

The Normalization of Violence in Heterosexual Romantic Relationships: Women's Narratives of Love and Violence

Journal of Social and Personal Relationships , Volume 18 (2): 23 – Apr 1, 2001

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References (45)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
0265-4075
eISSN
1460-3608
DOI
10.1177/0265407501182005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Inductive analysis of in-depth interviews with 20 heterosexual women who had been in violent romantic relationships illuminated women's use of gender and romance narratives to make sense of violent relationships. All participants placed themselves within western culture's primary gender narrative, which prescribes and normalizes dominance and superiority for men and deference and dependence for women. Participants also relied on romance narratives - which entailed both fairy tale and dark versions - to make sense of violence in their relationships. Interrelated beliefs that emerged in the women's talk functioned to legitimize both fairy tale and dark romance narratives. This study highlights the urgency of weaving alternative gender and romance narratives into the structures and practices of the culture.

Journal

Journal of Social and Personal RelationshipsSAGE

Published: Apr 1, 2001

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