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The Politics of Bread and Circuses

The Politics of Bread and Circuses City leaders in the United States devote enormous public resources to the construction of large entertainment projects, including stadiums, convention centers, entertainment districts, and festival malls. Their justification is that such projects will generate economic returns by attracting tourists to the city. Although this economic expectation is tested in the literature, little attention is given to the political and social implications of building a city for visitors rather than local residents. A focus on building the city for the visitor class may strain the bonds of trust between local leaders and the citizenry and skew the civic agenda to the detriment of fundamental municipal services. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Urban Affairs Review SAGE

The Politics of Bread and Circuses

Urban Affairs Review , Volume 35 (3): 18 – Jan 1, 2000

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References (27)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
1078-0874
eISSN
1552-8332
DOI
10.1177/107808740003500302
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

City leaders in the United States devote enormous public resources to the construction of large entertainment projects, including stadiums, convention centers, entertainment districts, and festival malls. Their justification is that such projects will generate economic returns by attracting tourists to the city. Although this economic expectation is tested in the literature, little attention is given to the political and social implications of building a city for visitors rather than local residents. A focus on building the city for the visitor class may strain the bonds of trust between local leaders and the citizenry and skew the civic agenda to the detriment of fundamental municipal services.

Journal

Urban Affairs ReviewSAGE

Published: Jan 1, 2000

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