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Under Western Eyes: Feminist Scholarship and Colonial Discourses

Under Western Eyes: Feminist Scholarship and Colonial Discourses UNDER WESTERN EVES: Feminist Scholarship and Colonial Discourses Chandra Mohanty It ought to be of some political significance at least that the term 'colonization' has come to denote a variety of phenomena in recent feminist and left writings in general. From its analytic value as a category of exploitative economic exchange in both traditional and contemporary Marxisms (cf. particularly such contemporary scholars as Baran, Amin and Gunder-Frank) to its use by feminist women of colour in the US, to describe the appropriation of their experiences and struggles by hegemonic white women's movements/ the term 'colo­ nization' has been used to characterize everything from the most evident economic and political hierarchies to the production of a particular cultural discourse about what is called the 'Third World.' However sophisticated or problematical its use as an explanatory construct, colonization almost invariably implies a relation of structural domination, and a discursive or political suppression of the hetero­ geneity of the subject(s) in question. What I wish to analyse here specifically is the production of the 'Third World Woman' as a singular monolithic subject in some recent (western) feminist texts. The defin­ ition of colonization I invoke is a predominantly discursive one, focusing on http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Feminist Review SAGE

Under Western Eyes: Feminist Scholarship and Colonial Discourses

Feminist Review , Volume 30 (1): 28 – Nov 1, 1988

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References (14)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 1988 Feminist Review
ISSN
0141-7789
eISSN
1466-4380
DOI
10.1057/fr.1988.42
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

UNDER WESTERN EVES: Feminist Scholarship and Colonial Discourses Chandra Mohanty It ought to be of some political significance at least that the term 'colonization' has come to denote a variety of phenomena in recent feminist and left writings in general. From its analytic value as a category of exploitative economic exchange in both traditional and contemporary Marxisms (cf. particularly such contemporary scholars as Baran, Amin and Gunder-Frank) to its use by feminist women of colour in the US, to describe the appropriation of their experiences and struggles by hegemonic white women's movements/ the term 'colo­ nization' has been used to characterize everything from the most evident economic and political hierarchies to the production of a particular cultural discourse about what is called the 'Third World.' However sophisticated or problematical its use as an explanatory construct, colonization almost invariably implies a relation of structural domination, and a discursive or political suppression of the hetero­ geneity of the subject(s) in question. What I wish to analyse here specifically is the production of the 'Third World Woman' as a singular monolithic subject in some recent (western) feminist texts. The defin­ ition of colonization I invoke is a predominantly discursive one, focusing on

Journal

Feminist ReviewSAGE

Published: Nov 1, 1988

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