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Unlocking the Hegemonic Power of ‘The People's Democratic Dictatorship’

Unlocking the Hegemonic Power of ‘The People's Democratic Dictatorship’ This article explores the relationship between the Chinese state and civil society byjuxtaposing the experiences of the Uygur ethnic group of Xinjiang province againstthe country's environmentally focused social organisations. It analyses thereasons behind the failure or success of each movement as defined by their abilityto create a counter-hegemony, where subordinate groups challenge a system in whichthe interests of one section of society organise, in Gramscian terms, the majorityof people's common sense. This article bases the creation of successfulcounter-hegemony on two premises: first is the suggestion that the key to developingan effective civil society is its contribution to the prevailing political agenda.The second premise is the implication that if a social movement is to succeedagainst a prevailing hegemonic power, it must in some capacity, align itself withthe prevailing interests and then co-opt them to forward its own agenda,constructing ‘good sense’ from ‘commonsense’. Both the Uygur and the green movements are reviewed in theircapacity to align with the interests of the Chinese Communist Party-led state, ofwhich three components are identified: (1) the party line;(2) national security; and (3) prevailinginternational power structures. In identifying these three factors that shape theinterests of the state, they become focal points around which social groups canadapt and manipulate to create a counter-hegemony. Thus, these three features becomeprongs of a key that can unlock the hegemonic power of the Chinese state. Theimplication of this article is that there are certain avenues for creatingsuccessful counter-hegemonic civil society movements, even where the state is most repressive. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Report SAGE

Unlocking the Hegemonic Power of ‘The People's Democratic Dictatorship’

China Report , Volume 41 (3): 14 – Aug 1, 2005

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References (33)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
0009-4455
eISSN
0973-063X
DOI
10.1177/000944550504100303
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article explores the relationship between the Chinese state and civil society byjuxtaposing the experiences of the Uygur ethnic group of Xinjiang province againstthe country's environmentally focused social organisations. It analyses thereasons behind the failure or success of each movement as defined by their abilityto create a counter-hegemony, where subordinate groups challenge a system in whichthe interests of one section of society organise, in Gramscian terms, the majorityof people's common sense. This article bases the creation of successfulcounter-hegemony on two premises: first is the suggestion that the key to developingan effective civil society is its contribution to the prevailing political agenda.The second premise is the implication that if a social movement is to succeedagainst a prevailing hegemonic power, it must in some capacity, align itself withthe prevailing interests and then co-opt them to forward its own agenda,constructing ‘good sense’ from ‘commonsense’. Both the Uygur and the green movements are reviewed in theircapacity to align with the interests of the Chinese Communist Party-led state, ofwhich three components are identified: (1) the party line;(2) national security; and (3) prevailinginternational power structures. In identifying these three factors that shape theinterests of the state, they become focal points around which social groups canadapt and manipulate to create a counter-hegemony. Thus, these three features becomeprongs of a key that can unlock the hegemonic power of the Chinese state. Theimplication of this article is that there are certain avenues for creatingsuccessful counter-hegemonic civil society movements, even where the state is most repressive.

Journal

China ReportSAGE

Published: Aug 1, 2005

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