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Valued Outcomes of Service Coordination, Early Intervention, and Natural Environments

Valued Outcomes of Service Coordination, Early Intervention, and Natural Environments A national survey of Part C early intervention program providers (practitioners and program directors) and participants (parents of young children with disabilities) was used to discern the desired outcomes of service coordination, early intervention, and natural environment practices. Survey participants judged from among 69 outcome indicators those that they considered to be the most valued benefits of each IDEA Part C service. Results indicated that certain categories of outcomes were more likely to be judged as the desired benefits of a specific Part C service, and that only two outcome categories (family satisfaction and improved family quality of life) were considered to be valued outcomes for all three services. Implications for practice and research are described. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Exceptional Children SAGE

Valued Outcomes of Service Coordination, Early Intervention, and Natural Environments

Exceptional Children , Volume 68 (3): 15 – Apr 1, 2002

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References (59)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2002 Council for Exceptional Children
ISSN
0014-4029
eISSN
2163-5560
DOI
10.1177/001440290206800305
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A national survey of Part C early intervention program providers (practitioners and program directors) and participants (parents of young children with disabilities) was used to discern the desired outcomes of service coordination, early intervention, and natural environment practices. Survey participants judged from among 69 outcome indicators those that they considered to be the most valued benefits of each IDEA Part C service. Results indicated that certain categories of outcomes were more likely to be judged as the desired benefits of a specific Part C service, and that only two outcome categories (family satisfaction and improved family quality of life) were considered to be valued outcomes for all three services. Implications for practice and research are described.

Journal

Exceptional ChildrenSAGE

Published: Apr 1, 2002

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