Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Subscribe now for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Was Kepler's Species Immateriata Substantial?

Was Kepler's Species Immateriata Substantial? fHA, xxxvi (2005) SHEILA J, RABIN, St Peter's College, Jersey City What did Kepler mean when he coined the phrase "species immateriata" to describe the mechanism by which the planets are moved around the Sun? Looking at the way scholars have tried to translate the term is instructive. I Many scholars have simply used the cognate, "immaterial species". But the Latin species came from Kepler's work on optics; species, which flowed from the body to make it visible, was adapted from medieval Neoplatonism and meant "form''.' Thus, C. G. Wallis used the phrase "immaterial form" in his translation of parts of the Epitome? A. M. Duncan tried to make his English usage sound more fluid. In his translation of Mysterium cosmographicum, which he titled The secret of the universe, Duncan used the term "immaterial emanation", certainly a more colloquial rendering of spe­ cies than either "species" or "form". Duncan explained: Kepler sometimes uses species in its ordinary senses to mean "appearance" or "kind". However, in the particular phrase species immateriata, which he uses for instance in note 4 to Chapter 16 and in note 3 to Chapter 20, in the second edition, he clearly means something akin to the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal for the History of Astronomy SAGE

Was Kepler's Species Immateriata Substantial?

Journal for the History of Astronomy , Volume 36 (1): 8 – Feb 1, 2005

Loading next page...
 
/lp/sage/was-kepler-s-species-immateriata-substantial-jUh6OFZ4yd

References (0)

References for this paper are not available at this time. We will be adding them shortly, thank you for your patience.

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2005 SAGE Publications
ISSN
0021-8286
eISSN
1753-8556
DOI
10.1177/002182860503600106
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

fHA, xxxvi (2005) SHEILA J, RABIN, St Peter's College, Jersey City What did Kepler mean when he coined the phrase "species immateriata" to describe the mechanism by which the planets are moved around the Sun? Looking at the way scholars have tried to translate the term is instructive. I Many scholars have simply used the cognate, "immaterial species". But the Latin species came from Kepler's work on optics; species, which flowed from the body to make it visible, was adapted from medieval Neoplatonism and meant "form''.' Thus, C. G. Wallis used the phrase "immaterial form" in his translation of parts of the Epitome? A. M. Duncan tried to make his English usage sound more fluid. In his translation of Mysterium cosmographicum, which he titled The secret of the universe, Duncan used the term "immaterial emanation", certainly a more colloquial rendering of spe­ cies than either "species" or "form". Duncan explained: Kepler sometimes uses species in its ordinary senses to mean "appearance" or "kind". However, in the particular phrase species immateriata, which he uses for instance in note 4 to Chapter 16 and in note 3 to Chapter 20, in the second edition, he clearly means something akin to the

Journal

Journal for the History of AstronomySAGE

Published: Feb 1, 2005

There are no references for this article.