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Where Species Meet

Where Species Meet Environment and Planning D: Society and Space 2010, volume 28, pages 34 ^ 35 doi:10.1068/d2706wsb Steve Hinchliffe Department of Geography, University of Exeter, Amory Building, Rennes Drive, Exeter EX4 4RJ, England; e-mail: stephen.hinchliffe@exeter.ac.uk As I followed bird spotters around the centre of a large city, looking for some of Britain's rarest species (black redstarts), something struck me. Bird watching in a city is different. Compared with the mostly serene atmosphere of a hide, where `twitchers' sit for hours on end, directing their expert vision through large lenses, hardly moving a muscle, urban birding is a much faster and looser game. While thankfully the habit of shooting any unknown bird in order to identify it is long gone, the rural birders still resemble snipers, patiently waiting for their targets to wander into their field of vision before being tracked with skill and precision by the hidden lens ^ eye ^ body. My urban bird ecologists were, to carry the warfare metaphor a little further, more like urban guerrillas. We clambered over walls, trespassed on railway lines, rushed across roads, carried kit that was altogether more mobile and more modest, and together with the birds, we competed with the sounds and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environment and Planning D: Society and Space SAGE

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References (3)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2010 SAGE Publications
ISSN
0263-7758
eISSN
1472-3433
DOI
10.1068/d2706wsb
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Environment and Planning D: Society and Space 2010, volume 28, pages 34 ^ 35 doi:10.1068/d2706wsb Steve Hinchliffe Department of Geography, University of Exeter, Amory Building, Rennes Drive, Exeter EX4 4RJ, England; e-mail: stephen.hinchliffe@exeter.ac.uk As I followed bird spotters around the centre of a large city, looking for some of Britain's rarest species (black redstarts), something struck me. Bird watching in a city is different. Compared with the mostly serene atmosphere of a hide, where `twitchers' sit for hours on end, directing their expert vision through large lenses, hardly moving a muscle, urban birding is a much faster and looser game. While thankfully the habit of shooting any unknown bird in order to identify it is long gone, the rural birders still resemble snipers, patiently waiting for their targets to wander into their field of vision before being tracked with skill and precision by the hidden lens ^ eye ^ body. My urban bird ecologists were, to carry the warfare metaphor a little further, more like urban guerrillas. We clambered over walls, trespassed on railway lines, rushed across roads, carried kit that was altogether more mobile and more modest, and together with the birds, we competed with the sounds and

Journal

Environment and Planning D: Society and SpaceSAGE

Published: Feb 1, 2010

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