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A Clinician's Guide to Systemic Effects of Periodontal DiseasesPeripheral Inflammation and Alzheimer’s Disease: Periodontal Disease

A Clinician's Guide to Systemic Effects of Periodontal Diseases: Peripheral Inflammation and... [Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is one of the leading causes of dementia [1]. In the United States alone, approximately 5.3 million patients have been diagnosed with AD [2] and in view of the country’s aging demographics, its prevalence and incidence will continue to increase as the population ages. One in 9 and one in 3 people older than 65 and 85, respectively, have AD, and approximately 61,000 and 240,000 new cases of AD in the 65–75 and 85 and older age groups, respectively, were reported in 2015 [2]. Notably, AD in the United States is ranked the 9th leading cause of mortality ahead of breast and colon cancer and is ranked 12th in contribution to years of disability [3]. It is estimated that delaying the onset of AD by 5 years could result in a 50 % decrease in prevalence 50 years later. Undoubtedly, as the population ages and life span increases, the prevalence of AD will increase even further, and in 50 years, AD is predicted to afflict approximately 16 million people [4]. Although the above statistics underscore AD as a major public health concern, the prevalence of AD will not significantly decrease unless novel approaches emerge to help prevent and slow the progression and manage AD. Therefore, efforts to “think out of the box” and identify novel, modifiable factors involved in the initiation and progression of AD are of paramount importance.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

A Clinician's Guide to Systemic Effects of Periodontal DiseasesPeripheral Inflammation and Alzheimer’s Disease: Periodontal Disease

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Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Copyright
© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2016
ISBN
978-3-662-49697-8
Pages
93 –106
DOI
10.1007/978-3-662-49699-2_8
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is one of the leading causes of dementia [1]. In the United States alone, approximately 5.3 million patients have been diagnosed with AD [2] and in view of the country’s aging demographics, its prevalence and incidence will continue to increase as the population ages. One in 9 and one in 3 people older than 65 and 85, respectively, have AD, and approximately 61,000 and 240,000 new cases of AD in the 65–75 and 85 and older age groups, respectively, were reported in 2015 [2]. Notably, AD in the United States is ranked the 9th leading cause of mortality ahead of breast and colon cancer and is ranked 12th in contribution to years of disability [3]. It is estimated that delaying the onset of AD by 5 years could result in a 50 % decrease in prevalence 50 years later. Undoubtedly, as the population ages and life span increases, the prevalence of AD will increase even further, and in 50 years, AD is predicted to afflict approximately 16 million people [4]. Although the above statistics underscore AD as a major public health concern, the prevalence of AD will not significantly decrease unless novel approaches emerge to help prevent and slow the progression and manage AD. Therefore, efforts to “think out of the box” and identify novel, modifiable factors involved in the initiation and progression of AD are of paramount importance.]

Published: May 18, 2016

Keywords: Mild Cognitive Impairment; Senile Plaque; Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy; Aggressive Periodontitis; Dementia Syndrome

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