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A Companion to Research in Teacher EducationYou Teach Who You Are Until the Government Comes to Class: A Study of 28 Literacy Teacher Educators in Four Countries

A Companion to Research in Teacher Education: You Teach Who You Are Until the Government Comes to... [This chapter presents the findings from a study of 28 literacy/English teacher educators (LTEs) in four countries (Canada, U.S., England, and Australia). Three interviews were conducted and course syllabi were examined. The study found that LTEs draw on three sets of experiences in developing and delivering their courses: pivotal early childhood events, classroom teaching experiences, and research work. Their courses reflect their values and experiences; they teach who they are. However, the increasing interference by governments in teacher education programs is having an impact on them. Surveillance by governments is undermining their identity as autonomous professionals. Externally imposed requirements (e.g., edTPA in U.S.) are compromising the integrity of their courses. The LTEs’ workload is increasing because they must prepare for frequent external inspections (e.g., OFSTED in England). As a result, many are feeling highly discouraged and concerned that their courses are not preparing new teachers to be effective literacy/English teachers.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

A Companion to Research in Teacher EducationYou Teach Who You Are Until the Government Comes to Class: A Study of 28 Literacy Teacher Educators in Four Countries

Editors: Peters, Michael A.; Cowie, Bronwen; Menter, Ian

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Publisher
Springer Singapore
Copyright
© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2017
ISBN
978-981-10-4073-3
Pages
135 –151
DOI
10.1007/978-981-10-4075-7_9
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[This chapter presents the findings from a study of 28 literacy/English teacher educators (LTEs) in four countries (Canada, U.S., England, and Australia). Three interviews were conducted and course syllabi were examined. The study found that LTEs draw on three sets of experiences in developing and delivering their courses: pivotal early childhood events, classroom teaching experiences, and research work. Their courses reflect their values and experiences; they teach who they are. However, the increasing interference by governments in teacher education programs is having an impact on them. Surveillance by governments is undermining their identity as autonomous professionals. Externally imposed requirements (e.g., edTPA in U.S.) are compromising the integrity of their courses. The LTEs’ workload is increasing because they must prepare for frequent external inspections (e.g., OFSTED in England). As a result, many are feeling highly discouraged and concerned that their courses are not preparing new teachers to be effective literacy/English teachers.]

Published: May 3, 2017

Keywords: Teacher Educator; Student Teacher; Classroom Teacher; Teacher Education Program; English Language Learner

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