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A Comparative History of Commerce and Industry, Volume IIThe Path to Industrialization

A Comparative History of Commerce and Industry, Volume II: The Path to Industrialization [The growth of a system of commerce and trade was the driving force behind the emergence of modern capitalism. This does not mean that it did not exist in many guises for many centuries before this transitional period. Certainly, trade and commerce must have taken place as early as the dawn of civilization and the first cities. Townsfolk need to trade with people outside of their walls for much of their food and most of their luxuries. We know that small-scale businesses were operating even before the Golden Age of Greece and the flowering of the Roman Empire. For the Romans, the Mediterranean was one large, watery trading highway. Early on, their commerce reached fairly substantial proportions and included trade with such then-distant lands as North Africa, Asia, and the British Isles. Such products as olive oil, wine, grain, slaves, and metals were regularly traded by the Romans for amber, jewels, gold, timber, wool, silk, and a host of other goods.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

A Comparative History of Commerce and Industry, Volume IIThe Path to Industrialization

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Publisher
Palgrave Macmillan US
Copyright
© The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s) 2016
ISBN
978-1-349-55223-8
Pages
13 –21
DOI
10.1057/9781137503305_2
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[The growth of a system of commerce and trade was the driving force behind the emergence of modern capitalism. This does not mean that it did not exist in many guises for many centuries before this transitional period. Certainly, trade and commerce must have taken place as early as the dawn of civilization and the first cities. Townsfolk need to trade with people outside of their walls for much of their food and most of their luxuries. We know that small-scale businesses were operating even before the Golden Age of Greece and the flowering of the Roman Empire. For the Romans, the Mediterranean was one large, watery trading highway. Early on, their commerce reached fairly substantial proportions and included trade with such then-distant lands as North Africa, Asia, and the British Isles. Such products as olive oil, wine, grain, slaves, and metals were regularly traded by the Romans for amber, jewels, gold, timber, wool, silk, and a host of other goods.]

Published: Dec 17, 2015

Keywords: Gross Domestic Product; Industrial Revolution; Business System; Cane Sugar; Comparative History

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