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A Comprehensible UniverseBirth of the Method

A Comprehensible Universe: Birth of the Method [Isaac Newton, as he himself remarked, was able to see further than others because he was standing on the shoulders of giants. The giants, like Copernicus, Kepler and Galileo, did invaluable work, but it was Newton who not only laid the foundations but also constructed the edifice. In Chap. 12 we take a closer look at Newton’s Principia, not to do the work of an historian of science, but rather to grasp the main features of the new mathematical-empirical method which from now on will be the only method admissible in physics. We do this by focusing on the Newtonian laws of motion. The problem has finally matured to the point of being solved: concepts referring to motion correctly defined, and the mathematical structure to model motion (calculus) ready to do its work. The results obtained with the help of the new method quickly accumulated, and soon produced a new image of the world. It will last and be mandatory for almost three centuries, but the most permanent result, from the perspective of the story told by us in the preceding chapters, is the method itself. It has created a new way of understanding, most probably the only authentic and viable way of understanding the world.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

A Comprehensible UniverseBirth of the Method

A Comprehensible Universe — Jan 1, 2008

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Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Copyright
© Springer-Verlag 2008
ISBN
978-3-540-77624-6
Pages
89 –99
DOI
10.1007/978-3-540-77626-0_12
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[Isaac Newton, as he himself remarked, was able to see further than others because he was standing on the shoulders of giants. The giants, like Copernicus, Kepler and Galileo, did invaluable work, but it was Newton who not only laid the foundations but also constructed the edifice. In Chap. 12 we take a closer look at Newton’s Principia, not to do the work of an historian of science, but rather to grasp the main features of the new mathematical-empirical method which from now on will be the only method admissible in physics. We do this by focusing on the Newtonian laws of motion. The problem has finally matured to the point of being solved: concepts referring to motion correctly defined, and the mathematical structure to model motion (calculus) ready to do its work. The results obtained with the help of the new method quickly accumulated, and soon produced a new image of the world. It will last and be mandatory for almost three centuries, but the most permanent result, from the perspective of the story told by us in the preceding chapters, is the method itself. It has created a new way of understanding, most probably the only authentic and viable way of understanding the world.]

Published: Jan 1, 2008

Keywords: Mathematical Structure; Experimental Philosophy; Preceding Chapter; Philosophical Level; Naturalis Principium

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