Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

A Conception of TeachingA Conception of Classroom Management

A Conception of Teaching: A Conception of Classroom Management Chapter 7 Classroom management is a prerequisite of the process, content, and student cogni- tive capabilities and student motivation components treated in Chaps. 4-6. It can be distinguished from teaching because it does not deal directly with the process and content of teaching. As Johnson and Brooks (1979) put it, [T]he function of classroom management can be distinguished conceptually from the teacher’s primary function, instruction, however intimately the two may be related in prac- tice....[E]ach of the two functions can occur without the other, since instruction does not always involve a group of learners in a classroom, and classrooms need to be managed whether or not instruction is taking place. (p. 1) The distinction between teaching and classroom management w as also identi- fied by Brophy and Good (1986) when they noted that [S]o man y findings [of process-product research] were derived from naturalistic situations where teachers varied drastically in their allocation of time to academic activities and in their classroom organization and management skills. The differences in student opportu- nity to learn created by these differences in time allocation and classroom management probably overwhelmed, and thus masked, the effect of whatever differences occurred in quality of instruction. (p. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

A Conception of TeachingA Conception of Classroom Management

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/a-conception-of-teaching-a-conception-of-classroom-management-uCC1eajoOc
Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
© Springer-Verlag US 2009
ISBN
978-0-387-09445-8
Pages
113 –122
DOI
10.1007/978-0-387-09446-5_7
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

Chapter 7 Classroom management is a prerequisite of the process, content, and student cogni- tive capabilities and student motivation components treated in Chaps. 4-6. It can be distinguished from teaching because it does not deal directly with the process and content of teaching. As Johnson and Brooks (1979) put it, [T]he function of classroom management can be distinguished conceptually from the teacher’s primary function, instruction, however intimately the two may be related in prac- tice....[E]ach of the two functions can occur without the other, since instruction does not always involve a group of learners in a classroom, and classrooms need to be managed whether or not instruction is taking place. (p. 1) The distinction between teaching and classroom management w as also identi- fied by Brophy and Good (1986) when they noted that [S]o man y findings [of process-product research] were derived from naturalistic situations where teachers varied drastically in their allocation of time to academic activities and in their classroom organization and management skills. The differences in student opportu- nity to learn created by these differences in time allocation and classroom management probably overwhelmed, and thus masked, the effect of whatever differences occurred in quality of instruction. (p.

Published: Oct 28, 2008

Keywords: Student Achievement; Classroom Management; Neighborhood Environment; Genetic Potential; Instructional Time

There are no references for this article.