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A Philosophical Examination of Social Justice and Child PovertyThe Injustice of Child Poverty

A Philosophical Examination of Social Justice and Child Poverty: The Injustice of Child Poverty [In the previous chapter, we sketched a theory of social justice for children based within the capability approach. We argued that, as a matter of social justice, each and every child is entitled to reach a minimum threshold of certain important functionings and capabilities, which are essential to her well-being and well-becoming. Furthermore, we have suggested that in the case of children, a focus on achieved functionings is often more adequate from a social justice perspective than a focus on capabilities. However, this assumption has to be understood in relation to the age and competence of the child, respecting her agency from an early age on. As children move through childhood, as they mature and develop, choice and autonomy become more and more important, and social justice reflects this by shifting its focus from achieved functionings to capabilities.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

A Philosophical Examination of Social Justice and Child PovertyThe Injustice of Child Poverty

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Publisher
Palgrave Macmillan UK
Copyright
© The Editor(s) (if applicable) and the Author(s) 2015
ISBN
978-1-349-49067-7
Pages
67 –117
DOI
10.1057/9781137426024_3
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[In the previous chapter, we sketched a theory of social justice for children based within the capability approach. We argued that, as a matter of social justice, each and every child is entitled to reach a minimum threshold of certain important functionings and capabilities, which are essential to her well-being and well-becoming. Furthermore, we have suggested that in the case of children, a focus on achieved functionings is often more adequate from a social justice perspective than a focus on capabilities. However, this assumption has to be understood in relation to the age and competence of the child, respecting her agency from an early age on. As children move through childhood, as they mature and develop, choice and autonomy become more and more important, and social justice reflects this by shifting its focus from achieved functionings to capabilities.]

Published: Dec 22, 2015

Keywords: European Union; Social Justice; Social Inclusion; Capability Approach; Child Poverty

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